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Code enforcement officers might have to wear uniforms in California????

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  • Code enforcement officers might have to wear uniforms in California????

    Looks like it includes building inspectors....................

    BILL NUMBER: AB 801 INTRODUCED
    BILL TEXT


    INTRODUCED BY Assembly Member Swanson

    FEBRUARY 17, 2011

    An act to add Section 829.7 to the Penal Code, relating to code
    enforcement officers.


    LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL'S DIGEST


    AB 801, as introduced, Swanson. Code enforcement officers:
    training.
    Existing law defines a code enforcement officer to include
    specified public employees whose duties include enforcement of any
    statute, rules, regulations, or standards, and who are authorized to
    issue citations or file formal complaints.
    That definition also
    includes specified public employees of the Department of Housing and
    Community Development who have enforcement authority for health,
    safety, and welfare requirements imposed pursuant to specified
    provisions of state law relating to housing.
    This bill would establish minimum training standards and a
    continuing education requirement for code enforcement officers. The
    bill would require each of these employees to complete a certified
    basic training program within one year of his or her initial
    appointment, and to complete intermediate and advanced levels of
    certified training, as specified. The bill would require public
    entities that employ a code enforcement officer to adopt requirements
    for, and require all code enforcement officers to wear, apparel or a
    uniform that allows members of the public to recognize the person
    wearing the apparel or uniform as a public officer.
    By imposing new requirements on local employees and employers, the
    bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
    The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local
    agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the
    state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that
    reimbursement.
    This bill would provide that, if the Commission on State Mandates
    determines that the bill contains costs mandated by the state,
    reimbursement for those costs shall be made pursuant to these
    statutory provisions.
    Vote: majority. Appropriation: no. Fiscal committee: yes.
    State-mandated local program: yes.


    THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

    SECTION 1. Section 829.7 is added to the Penal Code, to read:
    829.7. (a) The purpose of this section is to establish uniform
    minimum training standards designed to increase the level of
    competency and reliability of code enforcement officers, to improve
    and expand the professional training available to code enforcement
    officers, to encourage the active participation of local governments
    in the code enforcement training standards process, and to develop
    training criteria that will enhance each local government's ability
    to protect the lives and property of its citizens.
    (b) A public agency employing a code enforcement officer shall
    adopt requirements for, and require all code enforcement officers to
    wear, apparel or a uniform that allows members of the public to
    recognize the person wearing the apparel or uniform as a public
    officer.
    (c) A public agency employing a code enforcement officer shall
    adopt a set of standards and minimum education requirements that do
    all of the following:
    (1) Establish the number of hours of continuing education required
    for an employee to be certified as a code enforcement officer.
    (2) Establish an approved curriculum, which shall include material
    regarding changes in applicable law.
    (3) Require code enforcement officers to complete, and certify
    code enforcement officers as having successfully completed, the
    following training programs:
    (A) A code enforcement officer shall successfully complete a
    certified basic training program within 12 months of his or her
    initial appointment. Training may be suspended in the event of an
    interruption in employment, but each period of service as a code
    enforcement officer shall be counted toward the 12-month time period
    described in this subparagraph. The failure of a code enforcement
    officer to complete a certified basic training program within two
    years after his or her initial appointment shall result in the
    forfeiture of any accrued training credit.
    (B) A code enforcement officer shall successfully complete the
    intermediate level of certified training within 12 months from when
    he or she successfully completes the basic training program.
    (C) A code enforcement officer shall successfully complete the
    advanced level of certification within 24 months from when he or she
    successfully completes the intermediate training program.
    (D) Code enforcement officers shall successfully complete a
    minimum of 16 hours of in-service training each year to maintain a
    minimum level of proficiency and certification by California
    Association of Code Enforcement Officers or an institute of higher
    education.
    (d) The certified training program described in paragraph (3) of
    subdivision (c) shall be administered by any of the following:
    (1) An organization comprised of at least 750 code enforcement
    officers, which provides at least 20,000 hours of annual person-hours
    of training.
    (2) A career technical education program.
    (3) An institution of higher education.
    SEC. 2. If the Commission on State Mandates determines that this
    act contains costs mandated by the state, reimbursement to local
    agencies and school districts for those costs shall be made pursuant
    to Part 7 (commencing with Section 17500) of Division 4 of Title 2 of
    the Government Code.

  • #2
    Waaaaaaaaaaaa
    “Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.”― Mark Twain

    Comment


    • #3
      Apparel or a uniform. Could be a golf tee with the municipality name on it.

      Actually, a uniform could be anything.. such as your everyday workwear and some clown shoes.. or maybe those glasses with the mustache attached to it.. or an ID card on a lanyard. As long as you are readily identifiable as a public employee :)

      Comment


      • #4
        i still have my mickey mouse ears with my name on them, would that qualify?

        Comment


        • #5
          Agree with Tim. If you have an I.D. on a lanyard and add a baseball cap that states ______County Code Enforcement then you have met the intent. A polo or jacket with a logo would also qualify. Personally I like it. They would have to buy your clothes....nice. What will they come up with next. I heard today on the radio about some county lifeguards in Cali that are making $211,000.00 per year. They won't mind buying you a few shirts.
          Now accepting advertising.....

          Comment


          • #6
            And the code supports identification. I agree it is as simple as having a clip-on ID, and a shirt or cap. From the 2003 IBC; (only thing I have at home)

            104.5 Identification. The building official shall carry proper
            identification when inspecting structures or premises in the
            performance of duties under this code.
            Arguing with an inspector is like wrestling with a pig in mud, pretty soon you realize that the pig is enjoying it!

            This response brought to you by one of the paying members of the Building Code Forum.
            You can join the paying members and support this forum, for a small donation at
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            Comment


            • #7
              Our AHJ purchases our pants (docker style) and shirts. The shirts have our city logo on them.

              Comment


              • #8
                Becareful where you eat your lunch,
                that restaurant employee you cited last week for junk might put a booger in your burger since your not incognito any more!

                pc1

                Comment


                • #9
                  Personally, I don't have a problem with uniforms, I wear one everyday I work (Class C, badge, etc.) The question is....what is the interpretation of "...apparel or a
                  uniform that allows members of the public to recognize the person
                  wearing the apparel or uniform as a public officer."?


                  To me, a polo shirt, baseball cap, and ID on a lanyard wouldn't make you recognizable as a public officer unless you were very close to the person and I'm really not sure of the exact intent of the assembly bill.

                  Also, what is the exact definition of a Code Enforcement officer? My interpretation would be a person from the planning or building dept. that enforces the planning and building codes separate from a building inspector, but others may have a different interpretation. However, a police officer falls under the category described.... what about a plain clothes police detective or arson investigator?

                  I think the proposed bill is very unclear.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    A shirt or hat, or ID on a lanyard will all allow the public to recognize and identify a public officer. Lots of people identify you when you drive up in a city vehicle and get out with a clipboard or file.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mac View Post
                      A shirt or hat, or ID on a lanyard will all allow the public to recognize and identify a public officer. Lots of people identify you when you drive up in a city vehicle and get out with a clipboard or file.
                      Gee that sounds like me except I wear the shirt, cap and have a exposed ID card at all times. Only once was I ever asked to show the ID.

                      Except years ago the city would get you 5 shirts a year and then now it's down to 2. Sure make it look tacky wearing the older shirts at times.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        An act to add Section 829.7 to the Penal Code, relating to code enforcement officers.

                        legislative counsel’s digest

                        AB 801, as introduced, Swanson. Code enforcement officers: training.

                        Existing law defines a code enforcement officer to include specified public employees whose duties include enforcement of any statute, rules, regulations, or standards, and who are authorized to issue citations or file formal complaints.¹
                        Note that the legislation, if it becomes statute, becomes part of the Penal Code, will that make building officials sworn public safety officers? Is the word "any" going to be interpreted as specific statutes, rules, regulations, or standards, or is going to be interpreted as "all" statutes, rules, regulations, or standards? Is this going to make building personnel eligible for the higher salaries and benefits of sworn public safety officers? Will building officials become insolent and arrogant like fire and police personnel?


                        ¹ http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/11-12/...introduced.pdf
                        If you own a Tesla, have solar panels on your house, and eat Gluten Free, how do you decide which one to shove in people's faces first?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by conarb View Post
                          Is this going to make building personnel eligible for the higher salaries and benefits of sworn public safety officers? Will building officials become insolent and arrogant like fire and police personnel?
                          Will we then be able to grocery shop on "company time", too???

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by conarb View Post
                            Note that the legislation, if it becomes statute, becomes part of the Penal Code, will that make building officials sworn public safety officers? Is the word "any" going to be interpreted as specific statutes, rules, regulations, or standards, or is going to be interpreted as "all" statutes, rules, regulations, or standards? Is this going to make building personnel eligible for the higher salaries and benefits of sworn public safety officers? Will building officials become insolent and arrogant like fire and police personnel? ¹ http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/11-12/...introduced.pdf
                            In Florida, code officials are licensed by the state and protected by many of the same laws as police officers.

                            It doesn't create much problem.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Neophyte
                              Will we then be able to grocery shop on "company time", too???
                              Not only that, you should be able to park your cars in the Handicapped zones right at the front doors of the markets while you are shopping just like the firemen park their shiny red fire engines.
                              If you own a Tesla, have solar panels on your house, and eat Gluten Free, how do you decide which one to shove in people's faces first?

                              Comment

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