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Thread: Tamper Proof Outlets

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    Sawhorse
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    Question Tamper Proof Outlets

    Had a local electrician ask me about these today. I will tell you that I have never heard of such an item. He intimated that the county jurisdiction is requiring them. So, for those of you who are electrical gurus, my questions are:

    If required, what code section?

    Where are they required?

    Is it just a CA requirement?

    TIA

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    Sawhorse Codegeek's Avatar
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    It's in the 2011 NEC for sure, not sure on the 2008. I don't recall the code section and I don't have an NEC handy.
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    NEC 406.12. New provision

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    Look at NEC 406.12

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    2008 NEC 406.11 Tamper-resistant receptacles in dwelling units.

    We deleted it.

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    2008 - We kept them. Sometimes I have to tamper with them for about 2-3 minutes before I get the plug to go in...but I feel much more relaxed now when I see my son running around the house with cutlery or screwdrivers.

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    2006 IRC - Not required!
    2009 IRC - Section E4002.14
    2012 IRC - Section E4002.14


    2008 NEC - Article 406.11
    2011 NEC - Article 406.12


    .
    Last edited by globe trekker; March 8th, 2012 at 14:37.
    Please pray for Wilson ("Daddy-O") and his family!



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    Quote Originally Posted by Papio Bldg Dept View Post
    2008 - We kept them. Sometimes I have to tamper with them for about 2-3 minutes before I get the plug to go in...but I feel much more relaxed now when I see my son running around the house with cutlery or screwdrivers.
    It was discussed heavily by our code review groups and it was decided that the technology was not good enough. They broke too easily and could give a false sense of security to a parent just like yourself.

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    Sawhorse
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    Nec 2008 required all outlets listed in 210.52 to be tamper resistant, 2011 made exceptions to not require receptacles above above 5 feet above floor.

    As part of a luminaire or appliance.

    Receptacles in dedicated space for appliances not easily relocated.

    Non grounding receptacles used for replacements as permitted in 406.4(D)(2)(A)

    Also 406.13 guest rooms and suites

    406.14 in child care facilities.

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    Greetings
    The problem I've had with them in the past was that it was too hard to get the plug inserted and even harder to get them out. That said, the ones I've seen recently seem to be improved. Someone like my 92 year old aunt who lives alone could have problems with the things. I'll never forget my mom freaking out when she caught my little brother sticking a hair pin into an outlet and that's been 50 years ago.

    BS

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    Quote Originally Posted by gbhammer View Post
    It was discussed heavily by our code review groups and it was decided that the technology was not good enough. They broke too easily and could give a false sense of security to a parent just like yourself.
    I don't really feel relaxed or secure...with a 6 year old, almost anything is possible.

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    Sawhorse ICE's Avatar
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    Even the GFCI at the garage ceiling is required to be TR. I've heard that the next code version will not require TR beyond a given minimum height or behind an appliance.

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    Tamper-resistant electrical receptacles
    •Download a printable version of this fact sheet. (PDF, 33 KB)
    http://www.nfpa.org/assets/files//PD...rResistant.pdf
    What are tamper-resistant electrical receptacles and what is the new requirement?
    The 2008 National Electrical Code®(NEC®) will require new and renovated dwellings to have tamper-resistant (TR) receptacles. These receptacles have spring-loaded shutters that close off the contact openings, or slots, of the receptacles. When a plug is inserted into the receptacle, both springs are compressed and the shutters then open, allowing for the metal prongs to make contact to create an electrical circuit. Because both springs must be compressed at the same time, the shutters do not open when a child attempts to insert an object into only one contact opening, and there is no contact with electricity. Tamper- resistant receptacles are an important next step to making the home a safer place for children.

    “Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.”― Mark Twain

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    Thanks for the good info.

    I remember getting shocked (and a burned finger) plugging a kiddy record player into an outlet when I was about 5. These look like a very good idea but I will still keep an eye on the kids who visit.
    Last edited by Alias; March 8th, 2012 at 15:27. Reason: sp

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    Quote Originally Posted by BSSTG View Post
    Greetings
    The problem I've had with them in the past was that it was too hard to get the plug inserted and even harder to get them out. That said, the ones I've seen recently seem to be improved. Someone like my 92 year old aunt who lives alone could have problems with the things. I'll never forget my mom freaking out when she caught my little brother sticking a hair pin into an outlet and that's been 50 years ago.

    BS
    If your mom and aunt are in their 90's then they grew up not long after the current wars, no doubt they were very afraid of electricity:
    Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_of_Currents

    Current wars[edit] Edison's publicity campaign Edison carried out a campaign to discourage the use[18] of alternating current, including spreading disinformation on fatal AC accidents, publicly killing animals, and lobbying against the use of AC in state legislatures. Edison directed his technicians, primarily Arthur Kennelly and Harold P. Brown,[19] to preside over several AC-driven killings of animals, primarily stray cats and dogs but also unwanted cattle and horses. [20] Acting on these directives, they were to demonstrate to the press that alternating current was more dangerous than Edison's system of direct current.[21] He also tried to popularize the term for being electrocuted as being "Westinghoused". Years after DC had lost the "war of the currents," in 1903, his film crew made a movie of the electrocution with high voltage AC, supervised by Edison employees, of Topsy, a Coney Island circus elephant which had recently killed three men.[22]

    Edison opposed capital punishment, but his desire to disparage the system of alternating current led to the invention of the electric chair. Harold P. Brown, who was being secretly paid by Edison, built the first electric chair for the state of New York to promote the idea that alternating current was deadlier than DC.[23]

    When the chair was first used, on August 6, 1890, the technicians on hand misjudged the voltage needed to kill the condemned prisoner, William Kemmler. The first jolt of electricity was not enough to kill Kemmler, and only left him badly injured. The procedure had to be repeated and a reporter on hand described it as "an awful spectacle, far worse than hanging." George Westinghouse commented: "They would have done better using an axe."[24]

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    Here is what the 2011 requires and all the exceptions are new. Remember 210.52 does not require oulets above 5.5'

    406.12 Tamper-Resistant Receptacles in Dwelling Units.
    In all areas specified in 210.52, all nonlocking-type 125-volt, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles shall be listed tamper-resistant receptacles.
    Exception: Receptacles in the following locations shall not be required to be tamper-resistant:
    (1) Receptacles located more than 1.7 m (51⁄2 ft) above the floor.
    (2) Receptacles that are part of a luminaire or appliance.
    (3) A single receptacle or a duplex receptacle for two appliances located within dedicated space for each appliance that, in normal use, is not easily moved from one place to another and that is cord-and-plug connected in accordance with 400.7(A)(6), (A)(7), or (A)(8).
    (4) Nongrounding receptacles used for replacements as permitted in 406.4(D)(2)(a).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    Here is what the 2011 requires and all the exceptions are new. Remember 210.52 does not require oulets above 5.5'
    We are always 3 to 6 years behind in adopting codes.

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    Well here is what the 2008 states. The non-locking type was added to the first part of the 2011 so delete it and you get this.

    406.12 Tamper-Resistant Receptacles in Dwelling Units.
    In all areas specified in 210.52, all 125volt, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles shall be listed tamper-resistant receptacles.

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    I guess the argument would be whether the 2008 required TR in all areas of the house. For me it is just easier to install TR everywhere as I don't have to carry both types of receptacles. So few are above 5.5' that it really doesn't matter.

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    would adding 1 receptacle to an existing circuit require the new receptacle to be tr based on the code language? do replacement receptacles have to be tr based on code language?

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