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Accessible Entrances

Discussion in 'Accessibility' started by Engineer22, Aug 12, 2017 at 3:43 PM.

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  1. Engineer22

    Engineer22 Member

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    ADA 2010 question for you folks, thank you for any assistance on this:

    Given 12 building entrances, how many are required to be accessible?
     
  2. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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    So what type of occupancy/ business are you building??
     
  3. Engineer22

    Engineer22 Member

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    It is a commercial building, retail.
     
  4. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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    A lot of entrances

    How many would you say are main entrances
     
  5. mark handler

    mark handler Sawhorse

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    All if possible but
    2010 ADASAD
    206.4.1 Public Entrances. In addition to entrances required by 206.4.2 through 206.4.9, at least 60 percent of all public entrances shall comply with 404.
     
  6. Engineer22

    Engineer22 Member

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    Not specified on plan- just 12 are entrances.

    I see a requirement for 60% of entrances in construction, but a colleague has informed me only 1 need be accessible.

    Is there a difference for new vs. existing construction?

    Thank you.
     
  7. Paul Sweet

    Paul Sweet Sawhorse

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    Make as many as possible accessible to keep the lawyers away.
     
    tmurray likes this.
  8. khsmith55

    khsmith55 Bronze Member

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    Besides accessible "entrances" you may want to look at accessible exits. If the space requires two or more exits then there must be TWO accessible means of egress.
     
  9. mark handler

    mark handler Sawhorse

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    Hope he has good E&O insurance
    That's why we have so many lawsuits
    Misinformed people giving misinformation.
     
  10. Pcinspector1

    Pcinspector1 Platinum Member

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    Must be working on an attorney"s office.
     
  11. steveray

    steveray Sawhorse

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    Public and some restricted are covered in Ch. 11.....Typically not just 1....
     
  12. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    As noted by another, all "required" exits by code "must" be accessible to grade or an area of refuge.
     
  13. mtlogcabin

    mtlogcabin Sawhorse

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    Not correct under the IBC. Area of refuge not required for certain occupancies with sprinklers and only the public entrances need to be accessible.

    1105.1 Public entrances.
    In addition to accessible entrances required by Sections 1105.1.1 through 1105.1.6, at least 60 percent of all public entrances shall be accessible.

    Exceptions:

    1. An accessible entrance is not required to areas not required to be accessible.

    2. Loading and service entrances that are not the only entrance to a tenant space.



    1007.1 Accessible means of egress required.
    Accessible means of egress shall comply with this section. Accessible spaces shall be provided with not less than one accessible means of egress. Where more than one means of egress are required by Section 1015.1 or 1021.1 from any accessible space, each accessible portion of the space shall be served by not less than two accessible means of egress.

    Exceptions:

    1. Accessible means of egress are not required in alterations to existing buildings.

    2. One accessible means of egress is required from an accessible mezzanine level in accordance with Section 1007.3, 1007.4 or 1007.5.

    3. In assembly areas with sloped or stepped aisles, one accessible means of egress is permitted where the common path of travel is accessible and meets the requirements in Section 1028.8.
     
  14. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    There you go confusing the engineer, "it depends on the project (he didn't indicate new or existing)" error on the side of access for all (smiling).
     
  15. mark handler

    mark handler Sawhorse

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    Original post " ADA 2010" question NOT International Codes
     
  16. mtlogcabin

    mtlogcabin Sawhorse

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    the answer is still the same only public entrances are required to be accessible and not every egress exit it is required to accessible

    Public Entrances. The 1991 Standards, at sections 4.1.3(8) and 4.1.6(1)(h), require at least fifty percent (50%) of public entrances to be accessible. Additionally, the 1991 Standards require the number of accessible public entrances to be equivalent to the number of exits required by applicable building and fire codes. With very few exceptions, building and fire codes require at least two exits to be provided from spaces within a building and from the building itself. Therefore, under the 1991 Standards where two public entrances are planned in a newly constructed facility, both entrances are required to be accessible.

    Instead of requiring accessible entrances based on the number of public entrances provided or the number of exits required (whichever is greater), section 206.4.1 of the 2010 Standards requires at least sixty percent (60%) of public entrances to be accessible. The revision is intended to achieve the same result as the 1991 Standards. Thus, under the 2010 Standards where two public entrances are planned in a newly constructed facility, both entrances must be accessible.

    Where multiple public entrances are planned to serve different site arrival points, the 1991 Standards, at section 4.1.2(1), and section 206.2.1 of the 2010 Standards require at least one accessible route to be provided from each type of site arrival point provided, including accessible parking spaces, accessible passenger loading zones, public streets and sidewalks, and public transportation stops, to an accessible public entrance that serves the site arrival point.

    Commenters representing small businesses recommended retaining the 1991 requirement for fifty percent (50%) of public entrances of covered entities to be accessible. These commenters also raised concerns about the impact upon existing facilities of the new sixty percent (60%) requirement.

    The Department believes that these commenters misunderstand the 1991 Standards. As explained above, the requirements of the 1991 Standards generally require more than fifty percent (50%) of entrances in small facilities to be accessible. Model codes require that most buildings have more than one means of egress. Most buildings have more than one entrance, and the requirements of the 1991 Standards typically resulted in these buildings having more than one accessible entrance. Requiring at least sixty percent (60%) of public entrances to be accessible is not expected to result in a substantial increase in the number of accessible entrances compared to the requirements of the 1991 Standards. In some very large facilities this change may result in fewer accessible entrances being required by the 2010 Standards. However, the Department believes that the realities of good commercial design will result in more accessible entrances being provided for the convenience of all users.

    The 1991 Standards and the 2010 Standards also contain exceptions that limit the number of accessible entrances required in alterations to existing facilities. When entrances to an existing facility are altered and the facility has an accessible entrance, the entrance being altered is not required to be accessible, unless a primary function area also is altered and then an accessible path of travel must be provided to the primary function area to the extent that the cost to do so is not disproportionate to the overall cost of the alteration.

    207 Accessible Means of Egress
    General. The 1991 Standards at sections 4.1.3(9); 4.1.6(1)(g); and 4.3.10 establish scoping and technical requirements for accessible means of egress. Section 207.1 of the 2010 Standards reference the International Building Code (IBC) for scoping and technical requirements for accessible means of egress.

    The 1991 Standards require the same number of accessible means of egress to be provided as the number of exits required by applicable building and fire codes. The IBC requires at least one accessible means of egress and at least two accessible means of egress where more than one means of egress is required by other sections of the building code. The changes in the 2010 Standards are expected to have minimal impact since the model fire and life safety codes, which are adopted by all of the states, contain equivalent requirements with respect to the number of accessible means of egress.

    The 1991 Standards require areas of rescue assistance or horizontal exits in facilities with levels above or below the level of exit discharge. Areas of rescue assistance are spaces that have direct access to an exit, stair, or enclosure where individuals who are unable to use stairs can go to call for assistance and wait for evacuation. The 2010 Standards incorporate the requirements established by the IBC. The IBC requires an evacuation elevator designed with standby power and other safety features that can be used for emergency evacuation of individuals with disabilities in facilities with four or more stories above or below the exit discharge level, and allows exit stairways and evacuation elevators to be used as an accessible means of egress in conjunction with areas of refuge or horizontal exits. The change is expected to have minimal impact since the model fire and life safety codes, adopted by most states, already contain parallel requirements with respect to evacuation elevators.

    The 1991 Standards exempt facilities equipped with a supervised automatic sprinkler system from providing areas of rescue assistance, and also exempt alterations to existing facilities from providing an accessible means of egress. The IBC exempts buildings equipped with a supervised automatic sprinkler system from certain technical requirements for areas of refuge, and also exempts alterations to existing facilities from providing an accessible means of egress.
     
  17. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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    Well Engineer22 is to busy lately or he does not like some of us in the forum::

    """If anyone with "code and experience" might help me in understanding how to achieve this calculation, I would greatly appreciate it. Thank you."""
     
  18. mark handler

    mark handler Sawhorse

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    And the 2010 ADASAD? As I posted in my firtst post? Post #5 abv
     
  19. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    Atta boy MH! again, don't provide only the minimum, exceed it.
     
  20. mtlogcabin

    mtlogcabin Sawhorse

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    As a code official the minimum is all that we can require. Those that require more are exceeding their authority. Those that keep encouraging more/all entrances to meet accessibility may be perceived as "requiring" and it can be a slippery slope after a few years and 100's of projects to where it becomes the "departments" assumed requirement by the designers in order to get their projects approved.

    Just as contractors use the excuse "I have always done it this way" Government departments have "policies" in effect simply because "We have always required this" with no reason why
     

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