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Any code for distance from top of frost wall to garage floor

Discussion in 'Residential Foundation Codes' started by Retrojoe_1, Jul 24, 2018.

  1. Retrojoe_1

    Retrojoe_1 Registered User

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    I've been having a few problems with the contractors who have started building my garage. I had plans drawn up and stamped that called for a 4-inch reveal of wall above the finished garage floor. I believe in the plans the engineer specified "drop foundation 8in for a 4 inch slab" which I suppose translates to the 4-inch reveal. Anyways, when they got done with the floor it is only an inch from the top of the frost wall in the back of the garage and an inch and a half at the front. They used a pressure-treated sill plate for the framing, however now you have the OSB and the rest of the untreated Lumber only an inch from the floor. I told them that this is not what I wanted and they told me not to worry about it. An engineer told me that the untreated Lumber is so close to the garage floor that it could Wick moisture and rot prematurely. On the outside of the garage the grade around the foundation wall varies but in some spots it's as close as an inch and a half to the OSB sheathing. I suppose this could be dug away and stone could be put in around the perimeter. They poured a small slab on the outside of the garage right in front of the entry door. Somebody told me that the top of that could be considered grade and if so it's only a two inch distance from the top of that slab to the sill plate . If that is considered grade then they would be in violation of code because as I understand it the top of the foundation wall needs to be 6in from grade. And what about the inside? Is this a code violation of any means? Does anybody have any thoughts on this? I'm just really ticked off and not sure that there's a solution at this point.
     
  2. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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    Welcome

    Give it a day or two for great answers
     
    Retrojoe_1 likes this.
  3. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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    Do you know which building/residential code and year edition

    This was built to?
     
  4. Retrojoe_1

    Retrojoe_1 Registered User

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    They just built it last week, so I'm not sure. I live in New York state if that makes any difference.
     
  5. JPohling

    JPohling Sawhorse

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    On your permitted set of plans there should be notes on the cover sheet that identifies the applicable codes
     
  6. Retrojoe_1

    Retrojoe_1 Registered User

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    He didn't include anything like that and he didn't even mark elevations, so the builders ended up putting the frost wall below the grade at the front of the house and now my driveway is pitching down towards the garage. I asked someone if this was OK and they told me any set of stamped plans should have elevations and other info.
     
  7. mp25

    mp25 Registered User

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    Its not unusual for elevations not to be noted, especially for a simple project like this. If this was my garage i would not worry about the untreated wood being an inch away from concrete. As far as i know, wicking will not occur over 1" air space and its normal for untreated wood to sit on a sill plate with no problems. whats the exterior covering?
     
  8. Retrojoe_1

    Retrojoe_1 Registered User

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    Thanks for the input. Exterior covering is OSB, which will then be sided with Vinyl. I was thinking of using a joint and seam filler flashing over the bottom of the exterior OSB to protect it from air and water infiltration. I'm just miffed because I wanted the 4" reveal and now there's barely any. In one spot it's only 3/4 from the top of the floor to the bottom of the sil. The unfortunate thing about not having elevations on the plans is that the contractor used the ground surrounding the foundation as 'grade' and now the frostwall is lower than the ground in front of it which means the driveway is going to pitch down to the garage. The driveway inclines almost two feet and then declines back to the road. They should've built it higher so not sure how to solve this problem easily.
     
  9. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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    Well it might be able to argue contract. if the contract says build to plans, than it sounds like they did not.

    Have them get jack and hammer out there and install it per plans
     
  10. steveray

    steveray Sawhorse

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    I would worry about the outside...Not the inside...
     
  11. Paul Sweet

    Paul Sweet Sawhorse

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    I believe that sill plates, sheathing, etc. within 8" of grade need to be treated. I'm on the road now so I don't have a code for reference.
     
  12. mp25

    mp25 Registered User

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    IRC 2012 317.1, item 5 talks about where preservative pressure treated or naturally durable wood is required
    ....wood sheathing on exterior of a building having a clearance of less than 6" from the ground or less than 2" measured vertically from concrete steps, porch slabs, patio slabs and similar horizontal surfaces exposed to the weather

    the 8" applies to wood framing members...
     
  13. ICE

    ICE Sawhorse

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    So for many years 6" from dirt was fine. Then one day it changed up to 8". A curb in a garage is the way to go....6" if you can get it. I wash mine down with a garden hose....bang into the curb with tools and garden equipment. I would be genuinely pissed if it happened to me.

    Well then retrojoe,
    The difference between you and I is that it wouldn't happen to me....for the obvious reason.....but if I were you I would not accept it.....it would be done over and I might fire the guy when it's done right. The code has nothing to do with it. He didn't provide what you hired him to do.....by a long shot.

    If I could get a car into my garage a curb might stop my wife from parking in the tv room. I am always surprised at the complaints people have about contractors that didn't do what they contracted to do. Almost....no every time the customer has already paid the contractor. It's like their brain shut down at the wrong moment.

    Advice to the onlookers: Have clear detailed plans--never assume anything--verbal stuff is just stuff, get everything in writing signed by all with dates...it's called a contract. A little powdered sugar makes dates easier to handle. Don't give up more than 10% to start and no more until you are satisfied and preordained milestones have been reached. Document every interaction from phone calls to text and emails. Keep a diary. When the pressure builds, step back and reflect. Never agree to something without thinking about it for as long as it takes. Did I mention references. Try to be present for inspections and feel entitled to ask questions. Remember that everyone is working for you.

    Okay that's for the neophytes...and no fatboy, that is not another protected class...everybody else grabs the bull by the horns.
     
    #13 ICE, Jul 25, 2018
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2018

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