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Dead end corridor within mixed occupancies

Discussion in 'Commercial Building Codes' started by tuzi, Jul 24, 2018.

  1. Harrison Staab

    Harrison Staab Registered User

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    I have a project with a very similar condition flagged in plan review. This thread has been very insightful - thank you.

    One (possible) solution that has been proposed is a cross corridor door at the start of the dead end.

    In another thread in this forum, there seems to be conflicting takes on whether a cross-corridor door may eliminate a dead end at all:
    https://www.thebuildingcodeforum.com/forum/threads/dead-end-corridor.7049/

    What I would propose: a cross corridor door on magnetic hold opens to close in a fire alarm event. On the pull side (the main corridor served by A occupancy) would be signs on each door leaf "NOT AN EXIT".

    Unfortunately, the commentaries I have are silent on this kind of "creative" solution, and I found few mentions in a Google search on the issue. I'll soon be reaching out to the plan reviewer directly to discuss the issue, but I'm curious to know if the use of cross-corridor doors is really an acceptable solution.
     
  2. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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    Welcome

    So some say architects are eccentric ??
     
  3. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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    Will you define your “cross corridor”
     
  4. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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    If you are talking about a door across the corridor, to cut down on the dead end

    That is allowed, as long as on the other side, you do not create an exiting violation.
     
    Harrison Staab likes this.
  5. Robert

    Robert Sawhorse

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    And the door shall be non-locking.
     
  6. Harrison Staab

    Harrison Staab Registered User

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  7. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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    Without seeing the whole picture

    Looks good

    I am thinking add two or three exit signs as you walk out of the A, leading to the exterior exit
     
  8. Spector_51

    Spector_51 Registered User

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    I will never understand dead end corridors and i have been a code official for 25 years.
    1. I don't understand how the adding of a door across the corridor makes the exiting form this space any easier, less complicated, or simpler. If anything it may complicate things.
    2. I think that dead end corridors, in a facility such as the one that has been exemplified in this post, where the occupants of this building will be very familiar with the components of the means of egress is over-regulation.

    Satisfy the requirement for when two exits are required and the provisions for common path of travel and I am of the opinion you should be good to go. In most cases, at least those that i have seen or that i can conjure in my peanut sized brain, the common path of travel and dead end corridors are intimately related.

    I know i am charged with enforcement of what is in the book(s) but this never sat right with me.

    Of course this all goes away in high occupancy uses and where occupant are transient of in theory, "not familiar with their surroundings".
     
  9. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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    With the door added

    The length of dead end is Than in compliance.

    People hit the door and hopefully turn towards the proper exit.

    Without traveling down the dead end and taking the time to turn around and have to back track,
    Using more time,,,


    Which they may not have.
     
  10. Harrison Staab

    Harrison Staab Registered User

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    Thanks for the replies. I discussed this with a couple other more experienced architects, and while they haven't had to deal with a condition like this, they agreed it was a reasonable solution. We'll be discussing our proposal with the plan reviewer to see what he thinks.
     
  11. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    Finally, someone pointed that out, so is it sprinklered?
     
  12. Harrison Staab

    Harrison Staab Registered User

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    In my project, the building is entirely NFPA 13 sprinklered. On the upper floors in which the corridor arrangement is identical, the dead end corridors are not an issue as they exclusively serve group R-2, allowing 50'.
     
  13. Harrison Staab

    Harrison Staab Registered User

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  14. sergoodo

    sergoodo Sawhorse

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    Negotiating an additional door does not make the egress less safe. Without the door the egress is less safe for the other occupants who may make a wrong turn at their peril. Door protects the "unaware"
     

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