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Ground rod distance from foundation?

Discussion in 'Residential Electrical Codes' started by Pcinspector1, Dec 19, 2017.

  1. Mark K

    Mark K Platinum Member

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    ICE

    You are crossing a line by making it personal. What is the Forum policy?
     
  2. tmurray

    tmurray Sawhorse

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    I fail to see how requiring anything that is above and beyond code is any better than allowing things that do not meet code. Both are an official not doing their job. The job is to inspect to the adopted code. If you require more or less, then you are negligent in your duties.
     
  3. conarb

    conarb Sawhorse

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    T Murray:

    Your perspective comes from the fact that you have better codes than we do, our codes are now political, so from Tiger's perspective I take it he's trying to enforce from a health and safety prescriptive no matter what the codes say.
     
  4. ICE

    ICE Sawhorse

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    Mark K
    Your reaction suggests that I hit a nerve. Your responses indicate that you did not understand what I was saying.

    I think my posting was a positive informative posting.
     
  5. Mark K

    Mark K Platinum Member

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    The problem with an inspector enforcing his perception of what is safe as opposed to what is in the code, besides being illegal, is that there is no clear criteria what is safe. There are some engineers who believe that seismic design forces should be 50% higher than what is currently required by code. I could probably come up with similar examples for fire resistance or electrical work.

    One of the roles of building codes is to resolve these differences of opinion by adopting a requirement that applies to everybody. If the inspector can then replace the code requirement with his preferences then why to we need building codes?

    What is safe is subjective. This is clear if you look at the code development process. At one time it was necessary to define a number in a code provision. One group insisted that the number should be no less than 2.0 while another group said it should be no more than 1.7. The final number was 1.85.
     
  6. conarb

    conarb Sawhorse

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    Mark:

    I agree with you, the problem is that the I Codes have gone far afield into the collectivist agenda, I'd rather have an inspector that I could negoiate with for a safer, better, building than somebody enforcing codes like Green, Energy, or ADA to the letter. In my mind the 1994 UBC was the sweet spot, it is arguable that the 1997 UBC is better, but I think that should be dependent upon the location, like right over an earthquake fault then I'd say go to the 1997, but it's a total waste of resources in 99% of the country.

    The other day I heard on the radio that Trump had addressed the Farm Beureau, taking credit for reducing regulations, like dust, drastically increasing farmers' productivity, I don't know of one regulation that has been eliminated in the building professions, can anyone think of one regulation that Trump has eliminated in this business?
     
    #66 conarb, Jan 17, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2018
  7. Mark K

    Mark K Platinum Member

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    Conarb

    You do not need an inspector to make a safer building. That is your choice. The code sets a minimum.

    With respect to your concern about the collectivist agenda, in California take that up your state legislators. In other states talk to those who adopt the building regulations.

    The current code varies the seismic forces depending on the risk, so that the farther you are from a fault the less you have to design for. You may not see this in the Bay
    Area because here the accelerations are high but in other states the differences are more noticeable. I would go with the latest code versions. Part of what you may see is more thorough enforcement.

    Trump has no control over building regulations. Building codes are reserved to the states to regulate. Admittedly some of the code provisions are influenced by the Feds but that is the choice of the states. For example compliance with the federal flood maps makes it easier for individuals to get federal backed flood insurance but that is something that those adopting the codes could reject.
     
  8. conarb

    conarb Sawhorse

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    This is a good subject, when campaigning he told the homebuilders that he grew up at the knee of a builder and he was going to reduce regulations, he is reducing regulations for other industries, what can be done to reduce regulations here? Going out to lunch now, will pass by tent cities filled with people who can't afford to live anywhere but the streets, even Google engineers are living in their parked cars and campers parked on the streets.
     

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