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Need to tie down replacement beam on pier and beam

Discussion in 'Residential Building Codes' started by Daniel Boquist, Sep 10, 2018.

  1. Daniel Boquist

    Daniel Boquist Registered User

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    How do they appear to be substandard?
     
  2. ICE

    ICE Sawhorse

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    You have already said that the block-work is suspect. Being there should provide an answer.

    Of course the floor framing must be secured to a foundation.
     
  3. Daniel Boquist

    Daniel Boquist Registered User

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    The devil is in the details, esp. when people are inclined to make authorities sounding statements (too common on forums) without sufficient cause.

    My comment about the piers was in a conversation about drilling down into them. That would be scary because they are so old.

    If I were to attach the beams to the piers, I believe the code is an attachment every 6 ft?.. that would work since the piers are <=6 ft. oc.

    I found a piece of newspaper in the attic.. Jan 23, 1948. The piers are old with no visible problems.

    This house was well built. The entire outer walls are sheathed in 1x6 planks on diagonal, also, the ceilings are 1x6’s nailed on to the joists.
     
  4. north star

    north star Sawhorse

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    & ~ &

    Daniel,

    Since none of us on here can accurately assess the condition of the brick
    columns, I recommend that you discuss this project with the local
    Building Official, if there is one available........He \ she should be able
    to provide you guidance on what needs to be done........He \ she [ may ]
    require a structural engineer to evaluate the existing brick columns to
    determine if they are acceptable to anchor to........If there is no Building
    Official available, then you [ may ] want to either go ahead and hire a
    licensed structural engineer on your own; for an evaluation, or hire a
    registered, licensed & fully competent building designer to design an
    approved foundation [ i.e. - to be approved by the local jurisdiction ]
    before you proceed with anchoring anything to the brick columns.

    Yes, the beams need to be securely attached to the foundation.......We
    are simply trying to assist you in options for the anchoring, based upon
    the brick columns being in an acceptable \ approved condition.

    Again, ...if you have not already, please contact the local BO to discuss.
    Their [ official ] guidance is what will matter, not ours !


    On this Forum, we cannot really provide you with an accurate assessment.
    We can offer options, but your local BO will be the one to determine your

    course of action.

    & ~ &
     
  5. Daniel Boquist

    Daniel Boquist Registered User

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    I found the sc building codes online. Maybe I should be a code inspector. The answers appear to be this:

    1) The beams will have to be anchored to the footing because it is a class 3 renovation and the changes are structural and they are related to gravity and lateral loads.

    2) The pier and curtain are ok to have, but the footing a) must be continuous to tie piers together and footing must meet code. Also, continuous footing to tie piers together between load bearing walls, which may mean interior load bearing as well.

    - I could even build a treated 2x6 stem wall for the foundation wall and replace the piers and beams altogether. This would seem to be the cheapest and easiest solution that meets current code.
     
  6. JCraver

    JCraver Sawhorse

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    There's no way to tell that from the picture we have.
     
  7. JCraver

    JCraver Sawhorse

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    DB- Talk to the local building official, and he/she will tell you what to do. IF the existing piers are in good enough shape to accept fasteners/brackets of some (local building official) approved kind, then you're good to go. The only way you're going to know, is to ask. Get him/her to the site, show them what you've got, and go from there.
     
  8. Daniel Boquist

    Daniel Boquist Registered User

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    I’ve had a discussion with the building inspector at their office. He said that he could not tell me what to do.
    In fact, one issue was the length of the potential floor joists. I put on my plan new joists at 16 oc. He told me that that wouldn’t work... looking at the span tables. Then I started talking about alternatives ( I joists, etc) and he said.. “I can’t tell you what to do.. and the only person that can override me is a plan stamped by a structural engineer, etc..
    - I looked at the span chart.. problem solved by putting the joists 12” oc.
    - I’ve dealt with two different inspection offices in my life. In both, I got different answers to the same question from different inspectors.
    - I don’t know what is going on with the inspectors, but So far I am not impressed.
     
    #28 Daniel Boquist, Sep 13, 2018
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 13, 2018
  9. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    As previously noted by you above and in order to assure no future issues, replace the footings with code compliant continuous footings with appropriate beam connections but you may still need an engineer given the water table.
    Will you be living in it/renting/selling it?
     
    Daniel Boquist likes this.
  10. Daniel Boquist

    Daniel Boquist Registered User

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    Maybe, but I live in the SC "Lowcountry" so I'm kinda in the same boat as half of the state as far as the water table. A bigger issue than that may be the fact that I live in a seismic zone and reinforced footings will probably be necessary.

    I dont know what I will do with the house. I guess that will depend on how this renovation turns out! :)
     
  11. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    So you would be a DIY'r eh?
     
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  12. Daniel Boquist

    Daniel Boquist Registered User

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    Well, If I’ve worked on framing crews for 5-6 years building houses, apartments, etc. and I need to hire someone to make up some beams or build a corner post or a tee or a wall, I’d be pretty sorry, wouldn’T I? :)
     
  13. ICE

    ICE Sawhorse

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    Don't sell yourself short....there's plenty of engineering stuff online as well.
     
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  14. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    Ok, You are a "technical" framer but not an engineer. Your issue comes down to "engineering" numbers (and code compliance) vs dollars.
    It also comes down to "safety".
     
  15. Daniel Boquist

    Daniel Boquist Registered User

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    I also minored in mathematics. I can do the math.
     
  16. Daniel Boquist

    Daniel Boquist Registered User

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  17. ICE

    ICE Sawhorse

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    I wouldn't rely on a string level. Your string level shows the building way out of level. But maybe not because the string starts a ways away from the end of the wall.
     
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  18. JCraver

    JCraver Sawhorse

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    This doesn't help you with the code questions you're dealing with, but - did you get that house for free, or near it? All I saw while watching that video was dollar bills....
     
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  19. Daniel Boquist

    Daniel Boquist Registered User

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    Free. Just paid for land. The cost for materials isn’t bad at all.
     
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  20. Daniel Boquist

    Daniel Boquist Registered User

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    I won’t. The string level is a rough estimate.
     

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