1. ATTENTION returning members. If you are coming here from the old forum for the first time, you will need to reset you password. However, we had an email problem getting password reset links set out to a lot of the email addresses. That problem is temporarily rectified but IF you still have an issue, email me direct at info@thebuildingcodeforum.com and I will give you a temporary password.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Welcome to the new and improved Building Code Forum. We appreciate you being here and hope that you are getting the information that you need concerning all codes of the building trades. This is a free forum to the public due to the generosity of the Sawhorses, Corporate Supporters and Supporters who have upgraded their accounts. If you would like to have improved access to the forum please upgrade to Sawhorse by clicking here: Upgrades
    Dismiss Notice

C900 PVC as Water Service Pipe

Discussion in 'Commercial Plumbing Codes' started by Code Quaffer, Aug 31, 2018.

  1. Code Quaffer

    Code Quaffer Registered User

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2018
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    1
    I am curious if anyone has done a deep-dive into C900 as Water Service Pipe?
    If I look at the 2012, 15, and 18 IPC, as per table 605.3, the only allowable PVC must meet the following standards:
    Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic pipe ASTM D 1785; ASTM D 2241; ASTM D 2672; CSA B137.3

    Now, C900 by definition meets the AWWA C900 standard.

    ASTM D 1785 is a PVC pipe standard, with no reference to joining methods afaik. So it seems like it should be able to meet that, whether it does as part of the C900 standard, or separately.

    ASTM D 2241 is very similar to D1785.

    ASTM D 2672 is probably the killer: it's about solvent cement connections, so any gasket-sealed pipe system will naturally not qualify. So by this criteria, C900 is out.

    CSA B137.3 addresses PVC pipe & fittings, with various joining methods ("moulded, solvent-cemented, or threaded"), but the language in the summaries I can access does not make it clear if gasketed qualifies.

    I'm going to stop there: I think there are other standards for the gasketed joining systems, but as far as I can tell they aren't in the codes yet. I wonder if anyone knows more about this.

    thanks!
     
  2. cda

    cda Sawhorse

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    14,657
    Likes Received:
    836
    If it is the same c900

    I think it is used all the time to include for fire sprinkler mains??


    Do you want to define “water service”
     
  3. Code Quaffer

    Code Quaffer Registered User

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2018
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    1
    Water service pipe is the piping going from the meter at/near water main, belonging to the utility company, into the house. The definition in the International Plumbing Code is under Water Pipe:
    Water service pipe. The pipe from the water main or
    other source of potable water supply, or from the meter
    when the meter is at the public right of way, to the water
    distribution system of the building served.
     
    cda likes this.
  4. cda

    cda Sawhorse

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    14,657
    Likes Received:
    836
    Thinking c900 would not be used for that ??
     
  5. Code Quaffer

    Code Quaffer Registered User

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2018
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    1
    Well, I'm pretty sure the C900 industry would like it to be used for that, but they are not ever going to meet the standards that are in the International construction codes for water service pipe right now, because it appears to be mentioned right in the quoted standards that it has to be solvent-welded, and C900 is gasketed. I'm curious about how hard they've tried to get that changed, and why it hasn't been: "inertia" is a very likely correct answer, but of course, maybe they really don't perform as well...
    I posted here hoping to find someone who knows more of the inside story, but... not yet!
    Thanks anyway!
     
  6. cda

    cda Sawhorse

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    14,657
    Likes Received:
    836
    Maybe the smallest size is four inch???

    Not sure they make it any smaller
     
  7. Code Quaffer

    Code Quaffer Registered User

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2018
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    1
    I think you might be right, but that's fine for larger water services: it's often 4" or bigger. It may be that it's not that fun to transfer to/from C900, that is, joining it with the rest of the pipes in the building.
     
  8. cda

    cda Sawhorse

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    14,657
    Likes Received:
    836

    I am not a plumber or plumb inspector ::




    But you do not need to run a four inch pipe from the street to a house
     
  9. Code Quaffer

    Code Quaffer Registered User

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2018
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    1
    Not for a house: that's why I said "larger water services": i.e. a commercial building, or a multifamily building. They can be quite a bit bigger than that.
    For an IRC house, typical sizes are more like 1".
     
  10. cda

    cda Sawhorse

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    14,657
    Likes Received:
    836
    Around here c900 is normally used for city water mains
     
    Msradell likes this.

Share This Page