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Electrical and The Energy Codes

Discussion in 'Electrical Codes' started by jar546, Oct 25, 2018.

  1. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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    In all of my jurisdictions up north, we had a handle on the IECC when it came time for the electrical section. I even gave a presentation to my local IAEI chapter explaining the IECC's electrical section and recommended that every electrical inspector should be dual certified under the energy code too.

    I don't see that in all areas of the country, even down here in Florida where lighting controls appear to be largely ignored. How does your area enforce the energy code components that are specific to the electrical code?
     
  2. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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    Here is an example of an article from December of 2017.

    On December 31, Florida will transition to a new building code with updated guidelines for automatic receptacle control, electrical energy monitoring, lighting control provisions and requirements for additional efficiency package options.


    Changes for lighting control in the 2017 Florida Building Code – Energy Conservation, or known as the 6th edition, include regulations for automatic daylight-responsive controls, occupancy sensor controls, and exterior lighting.

    Amendments to the energy conservation portion of the building code can require dense reading with code references which can be hard to follow on first look. That’s why Harold Jepsen, Vice President of Standards and Industry, Building Control Systems at Legrand has outlined the biggest changes to the lighting and power control provisions:

    1. Automatic Daylight-Responsive controls are now required for sidelight and toplight daylight zones, as opposed to the 2014 Florida Building Code which allowed manual switch controls.
    2. Occupancy sensor controls used for automatic lighting shut-off have been expanded to include copy/print rooms, lounges, locker rooms, and warehouse spaces on top of the other eight spaces previously required by the 2014 code.
    3. When unoccupied, warehouse aisles and open area lighting must now be reduced by at least 50 percent.
    4. Building façade and landscape lighting is required to be control independent of all other site and parking lot lighting and must turn on and off as a function of the building’s use times.
    5. All other lighting that is not façade and landscape must reduce its lighting by at least 30 percent either between midnight and 6 a.m. or one hour before business closing, whichever comes first.
    6. Automatic receptacle control provisions have expanded, now requiring spaces such as conference rooms, print/copy rooms, break rooms, classrooms, and individual work stations to automatically shut off 50 percent of the receptacles when no one is occupying those spaces.
    7. The new version of the code adds one more lighting specific item to its Additional Efficiency Package Options.
    As a result of these changes, Florida will see a compelling leap in energy efficiency and reduction in energy use across all commercial facilities.

    Florida Building Codes are uniformly adopted statewide for all local jurisdictions, and is updated, by rule, every three years to adopt the most current International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The 2017 Florida Building Code for commercial buildings follows the 2015 IECC model energy code and, with a few amendments, including the automatic receptacle control and electrical energy monitoring provisions from ASHRAE 90.1. The code also permits ASHRAE 90.1-2013 to be followed as an alternative path of compliance.

    For more information about the latest energy codes including the 2017 Florida Building Code, click here.
     
  3. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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  4. mtlogcabin

    mtlogcabin Sawhorse

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    It is in the code,
    Think of it as a "special inspection" acceptance test when it comes to the systems operating properly
    Some additional training is probably required so the electrical inspector knows what can light can go into an attic ceiling assembly or no open boxes on exterior walls pretty simple stuff

    C408.3.1 Functional testing

    Prior to passing final inspection, the registered design professional shall provide evidence that the lighting control systems have been tested to ensure that control hardware and software are calibrated, adjusted, programmed and in proper working condition in accordance with the construction documents and manufacturer’s instructions. Functional testing shall be in accordance with Sections C408.3.1.1 and C408.3.1.2 for the applicable control type.
     
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  5. Rick18071

    Rick18071 Sawhorse

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    I don't know how many times after an electrical inspector is done I come in to do building final I need to tell them that they need to divide the lighting in hafe in a room. If someone else is doing the rough electric inspection I don't look at the wiring to to see that it passes energy requirements.
     
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  6. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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    Hence why I taught the energy code to the electrical inspectors at one of their IAEI meetings. They were clueless as no one ever brought this up to them.
     

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