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Flex gas line touching roof deck

Discussion in 'Fuel Gas Codes' started by Sergio Maldonado, Nov 15, 2018.

  1. Sergio Maldonado

    Sergio Maldonado Registered User

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    What would be the code violation for a flex gas line running from a gas manifold in a residential attic going to an outdoor grill through an eave that is touching roof deck?
    Gas line was hit during roof shingle replacement.
    It was in a very confined area hard to see.
    Luckily no one was hurt.
     
  2. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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    Install per manufacture

    Check to see if the instructions say anything
     
  3. steveray

    steveray Sawhorse

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    It has to be 3" from a threat typically....Install instructions would get you there...
     
  4. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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    Code section for that
     
  5. ICE

    ICE Sawhorse

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    I ask that the CSST be 18 away from a roof deck. The concern is that a fireman with a chainsaw can hit the pipe. A few years ago I was challenged by a contractor that ran the CSST attached to the side of a rafter. The pipe was a couple inches from the sheathing. As I recall there is no code provision for that nor was it addressed in the installation instructions.

    The installation instructions may have changed.....but nope, I just took a quick look and Gastite hasn't added anything about the tubing and a roof deck.
    https://www.gastite.com/downloads/pdfs/gastite_di_guide.pdf

    I might have posted something here regarding that. I did. https://www.thebuildingcodeforum.com/forum/threads/where-is-this-in-the-code.13482/#post-151345
     
    #5 ICE, Nov 15, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2018
  6. Ty J.

    Ty J. Sawhorse

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    From the 2015 IFGC -

    upload_2018-11-15_6-52-25.png

    upload_2018-11-15_6-53-48.png

    For the OP's situation, 404.7.2 would apply - a minimum of 1-1/2-inches is required from pipe to interior face of sheathing, or one must protect the entire section of affected pipe w/ 16-gage steel plate.
     
    cda likes this.
  7. Ty J.

    Ty J. Sawhorse

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    You ask? How do you avoid that being construed as directing work? Work which is not substantiated by a code requirement. The wrong contractor could fight back and your employer would surely be found liable for the costs associated.
     
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  8. Pcinspector1

    Pcinspector1 Platinum Member

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    ICE, your intentions are honorable but maybe you should submit this for a code change if deemed a safety issue. I'd be curious how far it would go up the flagpole.

    A chainsaw from above or a sawzall or drill from below through the ceiling drywall also could be potential hazards for CSST.

    If it's not in the CA code, it's a friendly request by an observant inspector. Conarb must be napping or he'd be lighting you up!
     
  9. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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    Thanks
     
    Ty J. likes this.
  10. ICE

    ICE Sawhorse

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    Well I've never claimed to be an angel. Directing work you ask? I have to explain code violations and the solutions day in and day out. I would call that directing work, wouldn't you? I am asked, "What should we do?" every day. If that's not directing work I don't know what is.

    Not everything is spelled out in code. Sometimes common sense takes hold and I do what needs to be done. Yes I know there are Conarbs and Mark Ks that think that I am the worst inspector on the planet because I apparently have more code to work with than they do. So what....I'm ok with that.

    In the example at hand, we are talking about a flimsy tube with natural gas located where a fireman can saw it in half. Hopefully the gas will be shut off so only what is left in the tube is a hazard.....but what if there was a mistake and the gas was not shut off? What then? Who the Hell put a gas tube next to the sheathing and what inspector let them do it?

    I have been asked why the tube is allowed in a wall cavity where the fireman might be ripping off drywall. The tube could get caught along with the drywall. While true enough the comparison is poor. Hooking the tube is different than sawing it in half. The roof gets assaulted nearly every time there is a fire.

    In the end I ask the contractors to do the right thing. If asking fails to get results, well then I try another way.....but I always ask first.

    Keep in mind who I represent. It is not my employer....it is not the contractor....it is the owner. The person that paid a contractor to perform work on their property. I have their best interest in mind when I write a correction.

    There has been few owners that would fault me for writing a correction, whether there's a code or not. When an owner becomes upset with my corrections, my best work, they are upset that the contractor let them down. They were worried about the entire process from the beginning. Did they hire a good contractor or a contractor that is all sizzle and no steak? Are they paying way too much? Is the work great or barely meeting code?

    What does an owner expect from an inspector? Is it just the code? I doubt that so I am willing to give them a little extra......but only if it's necessary.

    Contractors do fight and they do win when I have no code. I'll give you an example: I wrote a correction at a re-roof final that said, "Clean the debris from the rain gutter." The owner was a elderly lady and she would have to pay someone to clear the gutter of the debris from a wood shingle tear-off. Plugged they were.

    So I didn't hesitate to write a correction. The contractor took that to the office manager and I was told that it is a bogus correction. I pointed out the elderly lady has been left with a problem that the contractor created. The code would not back me....my employer would not back me....common sense was not allowed. In the end the little old lady lost out. She was left with a mess to clean up after a contractor wouldn't do the right thing. At least I tried.

    I should point out that I have written that correction several time since and no contractor has complained. I suppose they would be embarrassed to ask the office manager to allow them to be a pig.

    The statement "Directing the work" is way off base. Look at the pictures here. What should the corrections be if not explaining what to do? Is "Window flashed incorrectly" good enough? Or should I explain how to flash the window? Is "lath not overlapped correctly" all that they need?

    It's all going to be torn off and they will start anew. I reckon that's pointing them in a different direction.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    No "Directing the work" ....that's hilarious.
     
    #10 ICE, Nov 15, 2018
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2018
    north star, my250r11 and Pcinspector1 like this.
  11. steveray

    steveray Sawhorse

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    Counterstrike....for example:


    NOTICE: Only CSA approved hardened striker plates listed for CSST systems may be used. a. At support points and points of penetration less than 2 inches away from any edge of a stud, joist, plate, etc. shielding is required at the area of support and within 5 inches of each side (if appropriate). Use a half striker or a full striker plate in these locations. Figure: 4-19.
    b. At support points and points of penetration 2 to 3 inches from any edge of stud, joist plate, etc. shielding is required throughout area of support. Use a quarter striker plate in these locations. Figure: 4-8.
     
  12. steveray

    steveray Sawhorse

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    R106.1.2 Manufacturer’s installation instructions.
    Manufacturer’s installation instructions, as required by
    this code, shall be available on the job site at the time of
    inspection.

    M1301.3 Installation of materials. Materials shall be
    installed in strict accordance with the standards under which
    the materials are accepted and approved. In the absence of
    such installation procedures, the manufacturer’s instructions
    shall be followed. Where the requirements of referenced standards
    or manufacturer’s instructions do not conform to minimum
    provisions of this code, the provisions of this code shall
    apply.
     
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  13. Ty J.

    Ty J. Sawhorse

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    As an inspector, the job is to enforce the code. The code is a minimum standard. Agreed, it is not how I would build, but that is the role we are tasked with.

    And as far as directing the work, I provide correction notices that cite a specific code violation. How the contractor gets to the fix is their business. If I tell them what to do and it fails, i would be liable.
     
  14. JPohling

    JPohling Sawhorse

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    I would absolutely want ICE inspecting work that I was paying for.
     

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