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Service Entrance cable install

Discussion in 'Residential Building Codes' started by Pcinspector1, Jul 3, 2019.

  1. Pcinspector1

    Pcinspector1 Platinum Member

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    New home with a 200-amp main breaker panel with the service entrance cable coming into the side of the box at the basement wall corner. The sparky nailed two 2x4's behind the panel and nailed them to the existing framed wall which extends the panel out from the interior edge of the framed basement wall. Then he ran the SE from the side of the panel two feet and out the corner wall to the meter.

    So the SE is actually not in a wall, not in conduit and is approximately 5-ft above FF. You can hang your coat on it with a hanger. Looks like (insert crap emoji here if we had one)! Stud wall cavity apparently did not provide enough space, is what it looks to me.

    SE Cable not protected, I asked for it to be in conduit or framed wall?
     
  2. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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    Not into volts but sounds like a shocking hazard waiting to happen.

    Utility company set the meter yet???

    Is this under their ahj also?
     
  3. Pcinspector1

    Pcinspector1 Platinum Member

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    Meter not set, I'm holding that up a bit, I think it's a hazard, you usually see the SE up high ran along the foundation sill and then down to the panel. We have a 10-ft rule which would require a disconnect but like I posted it's going right out the side of the main house panel into the meter can omitting any reason for a disco.

    For clarification, this area the main house panels are set inside the home.
     
  4. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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    Would love to see pics.
     
  5. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    "Ouch" !!!
     
  6. steveray

    steveray Sawhorse

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    Do you ever see it protected on the outside of the house? You could hang a bird feeder on it.....I would not allow the 10' "rule" but to each their own...
     
  7. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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    That would never have been allowed when I was in PA where we had basements and would certainly never fly on the first floor here in FL. A 10' rule is in my opinion a bad move since we are talking about relying on the POCO AIC ratings for any damage to those conductors to cause a trip. NO way.
    Once I allowed approximately 10' from the entry to the basement to the service disconnect in a basement due to extenuating circumstances with plumbing and HVAC in the way but we required they have it in schedule 80 PVC or rigid conduit.
     
  8. Pcinspector1

    Pcinspector1 Platinum Member

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    They box framed around the SE so now its actually inside a wall cavity and no longer exposed to the open basement. Will be covered with drywall.
     
  9. steveray

    steveray Sawhorse

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    Which is exactly why I shy away from the 10' rule....Once it is in, it is in.....Nothing in the NEC that you can not bury SE cable in a wall. If you want to approve an alternative, Jeff had a good approach, that I have used in the past as well...
     
  10. Pcinspector1

    Pcinspector1 Platinum Member

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    NEC handbook, Service equipment- Disconnecting Means, section 230.70 General (a).

    The AHJ has the authority to make a decision on how far the SE conductors are allowed to travel to the service disconnecting means. The length should be kept to a minimum inside buildings.

    The three muni's I've worked for were all consistent with a 10-ft rule.

    POCO service to the meter can > 10-foot maximum length above top wall level or protected in conduit > to the main house distribution panel.

    If over 10-foot, a disconnect is needed after the meter-can and before the main house panel, Usually right next to the meter can

    When I saw the SE conductors in the basement, they were below the top plates and exposed outside of the framed wall and felt it was not an approve install. I know that in some parts of the county the main house panel is outside and this information does not apply.
     
  11. steveray

    steveray Sawhorse

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    There is no reason to run it that far IN the building......Run it outside...Once it is IN you CAN NOT prohibit them from covering it and that is where the real hazard is as you have concealed unfused power...
     
    rgrace likes this.
  12. north star

    north star Sawhorse

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    @ ~ @
    Did they also install something to protect that SE cable from being penetrated in the future ?

    @ ~ @
     
    jar546 likes this.
  13. ICE

    ICE Sawhorse

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    Ridgid comes to mind.
     
    jar546 likes this.
  14. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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    In exposed conduit would have been a better solution. You now have it in a concealed space behind framing and drywall. I would not have allowed that. That is unreasonable but the code puts that decision in the hand of the electrical inspector since there is no hard and fast number assigned as a limit to which you can run it.
     

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