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Dishwasher outlet behind dishwasher

SCBO1

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NEC 422.16 (2)

(4) The receptacle shall be located in the space occupied by the appliance OR adjacent thereto.

(5) The receptacle shall be accessible.

Q. Dishwasher outlet is behind dishwasher with cord and plug, is this permitted? I don't think the outlet would be accessible meeting (5).

But (4) has me comfussed, would this be for a roll-out dishwasher?
 
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* * *

Pcinspector1,

IMO, Condition (5) would overrule Condition (4)! I guess there could be

a dishwasher inserted in to a space that is deeper than the dishwasher itself

and possibly comply with Condition (4), but I would give precedence to

Condition (5) foremost.

* * *
 
Acceptable, see it all the time. It is, by definition, "accessable", but not "readily accessable". (which it doesn't have to be)
 
The receptacle should not be behind the dishwasher. To access it; you would have to remove the dishwasher. Just like the dishwasher drain and water line that go to the sink water valve and drain; the dishwasher electric cord plug should go to a receptacle under the kitchen sink.

It is dangerous to attempt to remove the dishwasher while it is still plugged in to the outlet; and removing the dishwasher is the only way to reach the outlet (behind the dishwasher) to unplug the dishwasher. If the dishwasher or any part of the dishwasher is energized you will receive an electrical shock at the very least. If you attempt to remove the kick plate; you still cannot reach the outlet without touching metal parts (including the motor) that may be energized; and is very dangerous even if you could reach the outlet.

Yes, I have installed and/or replaced several hundred kitchen dishwashers.

The dishwasher is "secured" to the cabinet. A receptacle behind the dishwasher is not accessible without removing the dishwasher.

Yes, I know the code definition of accessible; and you are still exposing especially the homeowners and electricians to the dangers of electric shock or worse, electrocution by installing the the receptacle outlet behind the dishwasher.

Yes, the electrician can install the receptacle; according to the code; behind the dishwasher. It's just going to take a little longer to get through all the inspections and final the house. :D

This is where a local amendment should be adopted to protect the homeowner (more restrictive).

Uncle Bob
 
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I agree with Mon Oncla Bob

Code says it is OK but I like best located within the adjacent sink cabinet.

So BIG DEAL, you have to drill another hole in the side of the cabinet.

Remember to keep the hole for the dishwasher drain higher than the DW drain and I like the electrical hole for the DW cord higher than the drain hose.
 
"Like" isn't in the code, sorry. (I see a lot of things I don't "like")

As described, it is code compliant.

Lacking an amendment as UB suggested, you would have to accept it.
 
fatboy said:
"Like" isn't in the code, sorry. (I see a lot of things I don't "like")As described, it is code compliant.

Lacking an amendment as UB suggested, you would have to accept it.
That is the real issue with our industry. This IS a compliant installation yet some inspectors must have it "their way" which takes away from the uniformity of the code. It is not what I like or how I would do the job but if it is code compliant then we pass it.
 
In case of fear of electric shock, most people can locate the breaker box and turn the power off to the dishwasher.

It is not only code compliant. It is generally accepted practice.
 
fatboy said:
"Like" isn't in the code, sorry. (I see a lot of things I don't "like")As described, it is code compliant.

Lacking an amendment as UB suggested, you would have to accept it.
The receptacle is equipment, so the definition of accessible that we should be looking at is "Admitting close approach; not guarded by locked doors, elevation, or other effective means." It would be reasonable to argue that if plumbing connects to the dish washer in such a way that you can't unplug it without resorting to tools to disconnect the plumbing with hands in close proximity to live parts we have a case of "other effective means" and the receptacle is not accessible.

GHRoberts said:
In case of fear of electric shock, most people can locate the breaker box and turn the power off to the dishwasher.It is not only code compliant. It is generally accepted practice.
But Part III of Article 422 requires a disconnecting means. If the breaker is to count as the disconnecting means, it must be within sight of the dish washer or be capable of being locked in the off position. If the breaker doesn't meet those requirements, and if the receptacle is judged to be not accessible, then the disconnecting means would need to be a qualifying unit switch on the dish washer, or a switch that is within sight of the dishwasher.
 
I thought the word "accessible" was now reserved for what we used to call "handicapped", I don't think the code is being politically correct in using the word "accessible" in that manner.
 
There's no plumbing to disconnect, you take two screws out of the DW/counter connection, and the DW slides out, the plumbing connections allow it.

It's going to be up to the AHJ, and it will probably vary. I've seen it, I've allowed it, I really feel it is compliant.
 
EPrice said:
But Part III of Article 422 requires a disconnecting means. If the breaker is to count as the disconnecting means ...
I did not say it was a disconnecting means (the plug serves that purpose), rather those who wanted to avoid an electric shock could use the breaker to accomplish that goal.
 
GHRoberts said:
I did not say it was a disconnecting means (the plug serves that purpose), rather those who wanted to avoid an electric shock could use the breaker to accomplish that goal.
The purpose of a disconnecting means is to disconnect power from the appliance so that it can be examined or serviced without danger of electric shock. The plug can serve that purpose if it is accessible. If the dishwasher can be pulled out so that the plug can be accessed without danger, as fatboy describes above, then I would agree that it can be considered to be the disconnect. If, however, one must resort to using the breaker to remove the shock hazard because the plug is rendered inaccessible by the shock hazard, then the breaker is serving as the disconnect. If the breaker is to be used as the disconnect, then it must be within sight of the dish washer.
 
Update: 2018

A dishwasher now requires GFCI. That changes things up as far as readily accessible is concerned. I have also been told that since the receptacles under a sink for the dishwasher and disposal is less that 6' away from a sink, the disposal will be on a GFCI receptacle as well.

All of this is common knowledge but I noticed a guest looking at this thread so I figured I should correct it some.
 
ICE, I believe the 2017 NEC, (2018IRC) has increased the DW plug-in cord to 78-inches to make it easier to get to that receptacle!
 
I don’t know but I’ve been told that a gfci under a sink is not readily accessible. I don’t agree with that. The premise that under a sink is “within six feet” is also a stretch.
 
I don’t know but I’ve been told that a gfci under a sink is not readily accessible. I don’t agree with that. The premise that under a sink is “within six feet” is also a stretch.
Affirmative according to the definition and 2014 Analysis of Change (below). And then to add the 2017

Accessible, Readily (Readily Accessible). Capable of being reached quickly for operation, renewal, or inspections without requiring those to whom ready access is requisite to actions such as to use tools, to climb over or remove obstacles, or to resort to portable ladders, and so forth.
Analysis.jpg
Measurement.jpg
Dishwasher.jpg
 
So a bottle of Lysol is an obstruction? I didn't know that AFCI protective devices must be readily accessible. Live and learn.
 
I didn't know that AFCI protective devices must be readily accessible.

AFCI breaker should be accessible in a breaker panel, what other AFCI devices are you thinking of?

The DW GFCI can be wired where the test button is on the counter receptacle making it accessible.
 
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