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Watch out Sears

Discussion in 'Industry News' started by cda, Jul 5, 2019.

  1. e hilton

    e hilton Bronze Member

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    Oh so cute!!!
    Might be ok for a hunting cabin. No mep, no insulation ... but you can live off the grid!
     
  2. conarb

    conarb Sawhorse

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    I guess these kit homes are built to modular home standards so they don't have to conform to code? I was in Oakland today and saw many "tough sheds" so they stay under 120 square feet and code requirements, but the big one was a huge steel frame structure that they have been building downtown, Now they are stacking housing modules into the multistory steel structure. If you recall they had problems years ago stacking modular units because of fire getting between the units, there was a disaster in Philadelphia, this Oakland complex has no ceilings in the modular units, so the floor of the unit above serves as the ceiling of the lower unit, obviously a way to get around the fire problem and stay outside of code compliance. I had my family with me today, but if anyone is interested I can go back and take a picture of them sliding these units together.

    I can only imagine the permit negotiations with the city on this, the steel frame has to comply, yet how do they exempt the modular units themselves? For instance, does this render fire sprinklers mute even though the structure is huge and about 7 stories high? Are disability requirements out the window?
     
  3. e hilton

    e hilton Bronze Member

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    Knowing that you always want to be correct, i will politely point out that the word is moot. But a legal document can be mute on a specific point. Whatever.

    So heres my question ... if you can see that there are multiple code violations, how can they get it approved? Is the housing market so incredibly tight and people so desparate for an affordable residence ... and developer/landlords so greedy ... that safety is discarded?
     
  4. tmurray

    tmurray Sawhorse

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    Just because someone sells it, does not make it code compliant. One needs only to walk around the nearest building supply store to see and hear about products being used in violation of the code, but as they will point out, it is not illegal to sell it. It is illegal to use it.

    Why would a modular 7 storey building be treated any different from a site built 7 storey building? I don't know why a building inspection department would even entertain that idea.
     
  5. conarb

    conarb Sawhorse

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    I have no idea, that's what I'm asking you guys, in the past I've seen them stack wood modulars together. for affordable housing in Oakland, but this huge "rack" system that they are shoving steel modulars into blew my mind, I will try to go by this week and take a picture, it's would be great to take a picture while they are sliding the modular units into the "rack".

    My question is what is your policy? You do inspect modular home foundations, but not the modular units themselves, there are also a lot of normal new high rise building going up, they, I'm sure, will be fully code compliant, probably cost a couple of million as condos, or $4,000 a month and up as rentals. We are bringing more and more people into the country and the United Nations wants them stacked into central core communities with mass transit and commercial within walking/biking distance to keep them out of cars, the cities have to get them off the streets.
     
  6. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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  7. conarb

    conarb Sawhorse

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  8. tmurray

    tmurray Sawhorse

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    From what others have said, it sounds like it is a little different there than here. No buildings are exempt from the building code, even single section mini homes.

    Here, A single section modular going into the mini home park, we only inspect the outside elements and the blocking system. For everything else, we inspect everything that is accessible. No, I don't get to see wall framing. But floor joists are often exposed. If things are required, like sprinklers, it is their responsibility to figure out how that is going to happen. I just check to make sure they did it.
     
  9. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    Con, the Disney Hotel on Florida was built that way, factory inspected, plugin and play. In your case sound transmission could be a big issue. Sea containers are popping up all over, both stacked and inserted into frames. The little houses are limited as to ridge height if fully assembled but this could be addressed with hinged roofs allowing for more ceiling heights in mezzanines. Also you could buy a used land yacht with pop outs and really style. Wouldn't even need a foundation just utility connections. Think Ridgecrest in CA for post quake replacement housing.
     
  10. Rick18071

    Rick18071 Sawhorse

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    Here in PA a PA inspector inspects at the factory and then we inspect everything that is done on the site.
    So if the thermostat wire is already in the wall but not the thermostat we just inspect the thermostat on the site.

    My worst inspection experience ever was when I inspected eight 2 story modular apartments buildings (2 units on each floor in each building) on the site and they really screwed up on the Type A and B units in the factory. It was a big mess for me. I called the state to see what I should do because it wasn't inspected right in the factory and some things on my end were not working right because of it.. As an example the base cabinets were installed in the factory but the counter which was installed on the site that had to be 34" high in the A Type units ended up too high, and they had pocket doors for all the bathrooms where the grab bar blocking had to be, thermostat wiring came out of the wall too high for the reach range, some door clearances and hardware were not right, electrical panels were to high for reach range.
    Also guards for the shared stairways was included with the modular sections but after they installed the guards on site I had to fail them because they were 36" high instead of 42" high and the hand rail was just on one side.
    Not the factory inspector's fault but the site plans showed the exterior doors at grade but when I went out there they had built stairways to the entrances so now they need ramp and the patio in the back ended up 4 risers below the floor instead of the required max. of 4" for the Type B units and level for Type A units. Later I herd the factory inspector lost their state certification.
     
  11. conarb

    conarb Sawhorse

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    When I saw them going together all I could think of is what a nightmare it would produce, unless the local inspectors aren't even looking at them, as it is I don't think they are going to produce the savings anticipated because they are not going to be getting around codes.
     
  12. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    You believe that "getting around code" saves money eh? Proper coordination saves money.
     
  13. e hilton

    e hilton Bronze Member

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    Clipped this headline from their site. Makes me think we are inching ... or rushing ... toward the highly densified cities from some if the Arnold Schwarz.. sci-fi movies ...
    SUSTAINABLE DENSIFICATION OF URBAN CORES
     

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