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2018 IBC 1024 Exit Passageways

Discussion in 'Commercial Building Codes' started by redbird11, Nov 7, 2019.

  1. redbird11

    redbird11 Sawhorse

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    1024.1 Exit passageways. Exit passageways serving as an exit component in a means of egress system shall comply with the requirements of this section. An exit passageway shall not be used for any purpose other than as a means of egress and a circulation path.

    My interpretation has been that you can only go out an exit passageway, that you cannot go in. However, what is meant by "a circulation path".

    Can you in fact go in an exit passageway?
     
  2. RLGA

    RLGA Sawhorse

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    Yes, but unlike corridors, the doors to access the spaces will have higher fire-protection ratings, no other openings are permitted (i.e., fire windows), no closets (storage, electrical, mechanical, IT, etc.) can open off an exit passageway, and no lobbies or waiting areas “constructed as required” for exit passageways would be permitted. Although exit passageways can be used for circulation, they will be very utilitarian in nature, so they are typically left for secondary circulation paths or for egress only.
     
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  3. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    Excellent points of clarification RLGA, however I still miss the simpler terms of: exit and corridor.
     
  4. RLGA

    RLGA Sawhorse

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    The terms still exist. Corridors are either unprotected or minimally protected and provide access to an exit.; whereas, an exit provides a protected path to the exit discharge. If exits were only to be used as exits, then the doors that are used for entering and the enclosed stairways used for accessing other stories (including basements) could not be called "exits."
     
  5. Ty J.

    Ty J. Sawhorse

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    I think that you meant...

    ...whereas, an exit passgeway provides...
     
    #5 Ty J., Nov 8, 2019 at 1:13 PM
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2019 at 2:30 PM
  6. Yikes

    Yikes Gold Member

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    I once had a project to adaptively reuse a building from a former R occupancy into "E" occupancy private school classrooms. The existing building had a section of corridor that was plenty wide for the calculated occupant load, but was a few inches shy of the code minimum 6' corridor width for "E" occupancies. Widening the corridor was structurally impractical.

    So, we reconfigured that section of the corridor to comply with the requirements an "exit passageway", for which the code does not have the min. 6' width requirement. No lockers, no furniture, no windows, no bulletin boards in this passageway - - nothing allowed but some 4"x4" junction boxes, lights and exit signs, but it worked from a code compliance standpoint, and this solution had specific review and full approval of the AHJ. Painted school graphics on the walls keep the space from looking too dull, and the graphics also discourage people from putting up posters, etc.
     
  7. RLGA

    RLGA Sawhorse

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    No. A corridor does not lead to the exit discharge--the exit does. A corridor leads to an exit. Corridors are not always protected (see first part of my response).
     
  8. Ty J.

    Ty J. Sawhorse

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    Dag nabbit...meant exit passageway.
     
  9. RLGA

    RLGA Sawhorse

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    My answer would still be "no" because an exit must lead to the exit discharge--a single component such as an exit passageway or an enclosed exit stairway or ramp does not necessarily have to lead to an exit discharge. An exit passageway could lead to another exit or an exit stairway (or ramp) could lead to an exit passageway.

    For example, an exit stairway connects stories 6 through 4, but on the 4th story an exit passageway is provided to link to another exit stairway that goes from the 4th story to the 1st story to exit the building at an exterior door from the stairway enclosure (i.e., exit discharge); thus, in this case, the exit passageway did not lead to an exit discharge, but to another exit stairway. It was the exit (a combination of exit components) that led to the exit discharge.

    Refer to Section 1024.4 for exit passageways and Section 1023.3 for interior exit stairways and ramps.
     
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