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ADA inspection cert

e hilton

SILVER MEMBER
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
3,157
Location
Virginia
Question: is there a program to become certified as an ADA inspector? My company has facilities nation wide and ADA compliance is becoming a big deal. We typically pay an architect to survey the properties and call out deficiencies, i was thinking maybe i could certified to do that.
 
The problem you may encounter, accessibility typically differs from state on year/edition adopted so it can become tricky in a quick minute. ADA is a different beast.
We use a standardized inspection form from adachecklist.org titled “ada checklist for existing facilities”. About 90 pages. Its simple enough that almost anyone can read the items and determine compliance. I am looking for some certification that i can achieve to show that we don’t need to pay an architect.
 

That's as close as you're going to get, I think. Like they said every State is different, so even if you survey a site and it meets the ICC/ANSI standards it may still be in violation of the code in the State you're in.

An example - Code says 3000 sq. ft. for a floor before an elevator is required, but IL says you only get 1000 sq. ft. If you didn't know that and told someone with a 2500 sq. ft. floor and no elevator they were compliant, it might could come back and bite you in the ___.
 
That's as close as you're going to get, I think. Like they said every State is different, so even if you survey a site and it meets the ICC/ANSI standards it may still be in violation of the code in the State you're in.

An example - Code says 3000 sq. ft. for a floor before an elevator is required, but IL says you only get 1000 sq. ft. If you didn't know that and told someone with a 2500 sq. ft. floor and no elevator they were compliant, it might could come back and bite you in the ___.

ICC and ADA are dissimilar in many areas. It is necessary to also know the year of construction, source of initial funding, state amendments, etc. Texas also has a program TAS but there is no current national ADA compliance program. Contact ACIA (American Construction Inspectors Association) for their program.
If you intend to pursue this you had better have E & O and a waiver of liability for barrier removal M & M's.

The U of Missouri offers an ADA Coordinator certification with 30 units of classes, an exam an annual symposium (cancelled this year - see ADA Symposiun 2020 for info on sessions.

You will also need to register for and attend/catchup on "free" monthly webinars from the Access Board (they are archived) You don't learn this stuff overnight and checklists are only a starting point. I am an architect and hold both CASp, ACIA and ADA Coordinator certifications.
 
I would suggest sitting for the Certified Access Specialist (CASp) exam. California has the most restrictive accessibility standards whereas the ADA is the minimum standard that all states must comply with. If your company has locations nationwide, I think your company would see value in a certification that tests your knowledge of the whole spectrum of accessibility compliance.
 
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