• Welcome to the new and improved Building Code Forum. We appreciate you being here and hope that you are getting the information that you need concerning all codes of the building trades. This is a free forum to the public due to the generosity of the Sawhorses, Corporate Supporters and Supporters who have upgraded their accounts. If you would like to have improved access to the forum please upgrade to Sawhorse by first logging in then clicking here: Upgrades

California MagLocked Showroom Door

frankjr

Registered User
Joined
Jun 30, 2021
Messages
11
Location
Southern California (By the Big Mouse)
My building is an Auto Dealership in Anaheim, California.

The showroom has 5 glass door exits that are all potential means of egress from the building.

The showroom doors are always open/unlocked except after hours when the business is closed down at night and secured. Currently, we secure the doors with double sided keyed Deadbolts when we close at night.

In an effort to get rid of keyed locks, I would like to lock these doors at night with MagLocks.

In practical terms, I don't see how either of these situations are different. If a stowaway got locked in the building after hours, they would have no way of exiting the building (break a window I guess), until we re-opened in the morning in both scenarios (Maglock or Keyed Deadbolts).

In reality, I'm guessing code is going to require that unlike the keyed deadbolt scenario, the second I MagLock the doors after hours (building is unoccupied when we lock up at night) , I'm going to need to provide Exit mechanisms for the MagLocks (Door mounted releases, or Sensor + button) ?

Your thoughts?
 

LGreene

Corporate Supporter
Staff member
Joined
Oct 20, 2009
Messages
1,151
Location
San Miguel de Allende, Mexico
Technically, the key-operated lock section only applies to something like a double-cylinder deadbolt. I don't see the mag-lock as much different in functionality with regard to egress, but the intent with the key-operated lock is that only someone with the key can lock it. With mag-locks there are more opportunities for something to go wrong, like if the access control system timer automatically locked the mag-locks when the business was open.

I am not an AHJ, but in my experience with the codes, I would say that if you want to use mag-locks, you should include the sensor, push button, fire alarm release and power failure release required by code. Or you could get approval from the AHJ to substitute the mag-lock for a double-cylinder deadbolt, if the proposed system met the code requirements.
 

Msradell

Sawhorse
Joined
Jul 23, 2011
Messages
1,197
Location
Louisville Kentucky
I'm assuming you have backup power of some type available for the locks? Especially the ongoing roaming black/brown outs in California. You certainly are going to need it
 

frankjr

Registered User
Joined
Jun 30, 2021
Messages
11
Location
Southern California (By the Big Mouse)
I'm assuming you have backup power of some type available for the locks? Especially the ongoing roaming black/brown outs in California. You certainly are going to need it
Yes my plan would be to provide about 8 hours power backup.
I'm also planning on having keyed deadlocks (I would be the only one with that key) that will only be used with a system failure or an extended closure.
 

steveray

Sawhorse
Joined
Nov 25, 2009
Messages
9,903
Location
West of the river CT
1010.1.9.9 Electromagnetically locked egress doors.
Doors in the means of egress in buildings with an occupancy
in Group A, B, E, I-1, I-2, I-4, M, R-1 or R-2 and
doors to tenant spaces in Group A, B, E, I-1, I-2, I-4,
M, R-1 or R-2 shall be permitted to be locked with an
electromagnetic locking system where equipped with
hardware that incorporates a built-in switch and where
installed and operated in accordance with all of the following:
1. The hardware that is affixed to the door leaf has
an obvious method of operation that is readily
operated under all lighting conditions.
2. The hardware is capable of being operated with
one hand.
3. Operation of the hardware directly interrupts the
power to the electromagnetic lock and unlocks
the door immediately.
4. Loss of power to the locking system automatically
unlocks the door.
5. Where panic or fire exit hardware is required by
Section 1010.1.10, operation of the panic or fire
exit hardware also releases the electromagnetic
lock.
6. The locking system units shall be listed in accordance
with UL 294.
 

frankjr

Registered User
Joined
Jun 30, 2021
Messages
11
Location
Southern California (By the Big Mouse)
1010.1.9.9 Electromagnetically locked egress doors.
Doors in the means of egress in buildings with an occupancy
in Group A, B, E, I-1, I-2, I-4, M, R-1 or R-2 and
doors to tenant spaces in Group A, B, E, I-1, I-2, I-4,
M, R-1 or R-2 shall be permitted to be locked with an
electromagnetic locking system where equipped with
hardware that incorporates a built-in switch and where
installed and operated in accordance with all of the following:
1. The hardware that is affixed to the door leaf has
an obvious method of operation that is readily
operated under all lighting conditions.
2. The hardware is capable of being operated with
one hand.
3. Operation of the hardware directly interrupts the
power to the electromagnetic lock and unlocks
the door immediately.
4. Loss of power to the locking system automatically
unlocks the door.
5. Where panic or fire exit hardware is required by
Section 1010.1.10, operation of the panic or fire
exit hardware also releases the electromagnetic
lock.
6. The locking system units shall be listed in accordance
with UL 294.

Thank you. I came across that and understand the thought behind it, if those locks are going to be used during business hours ever.
I was hoping (Even though I knew better) via everyone's experience there were some ancillary codes that covered my specific usage... (After closing, in lieu of overnight deadbolts being locked).

As Lori Greene mentioned earlier in the thread, my use would be result in an identical situation to a keyed deadbolt.

I suppose people can argue that the system could malfunction and lock accidently ... ?!

Thanks everyone!
 

redeyedfly

Registered User
Joined
Feb 22, 2021
Messages
465
Location
Minneapolis, MN
You can't lock someone into your building ever. There must be egress doors with panic hardware (>49 occ). It sounds like you aren't meeting code right now.

Also, mag locks are useless for security. You can literally open them with a strong pull. They're also prone to frequent malfunctions. Mag locks should only be used if there are no other alternatives. And again, they aren't for security, they only keep the honest people out.

If you want central controlled/fob access you would need electrified strikes or latches. Strikes probably won't work since the jambs are not prepped and no LV conduit is run. There are electronic latches, including panic hardware, that can be battery operated and update access control through the fob.
 

classicT

Sawhorse
Joined
Aug 2, 2017
Messages
2,234
Location
Washington State
You can't lock someone into your building ever. There must be egress doors with panic hardware (>49 occ).
That is a false statement.

First, panic hardware is not required for all occupancies with >49 occupants. See IBC Section 1010.1.10.

1010.1.10 Panic and Fire Exit Hardware
Swinging doors serving a Group H occupancy and swinging doors serving rooms or spaces with an occupant load of 50 or more in a Group A or E occupancy shall not be provided with a latch or lock other than panic hardware or fire exit hardware.
Exceptions:
  1. A main exit of a Group A occupancy shall be permitted to have locking devices in accordance with Section 1010.1.9.4, Item 2.
  2. Doors provided with panic hardware or fire exit hardware and serving a Group A or E occupancy shall be permitted to be electrically locked in accordance with Section 1010.1.9.9 or 1010.1.9.10.
Electrical rooms with equipment rated 1,200 amperes or more and over 6 feet (1829 mm) wide, and that contain overcurrent devices, switching devices or control devices with exit or exit access doors, shall be equipped with panic hardware or fire exit hardware. The doors shall swing in the direction of egress travel.
From what I can tell, this is a Group B occupancy. In that case, panic hardware is not required at all.

Second, "you cant lock someone into your building ever" is also false. See IBC Section 1010.1.9.4

1010.1.9.4 Locks and Latches
Locks and latches shall be permitted to prevent operation of doors where any of the following exist:
  1. Places of detention or restraint.
  2. In buildings in occupancy Group A having an occupant load of 300 or less, Groups B, F, M and S, and in places of religious worship, the main door or doors are permitted to be equipped with key-operated locking devices from the egress side provided:
    1. 2.1. The locking device is readily distinguishable as locked.
    2. 2.2. A readily visible durable sign is posted on the egress side on or adjacent to the door stating: THIS DOOR TO REMAIN UNLOCKED WHEN THIS SPACE IS OCCUPIED. The sign shall be in letters 1 inch (25 mm) high on a contrasting background.
    3. 2.3. The use of the key-operated locking device is revocable by the building official for due cause.
  3. Where egress doors are used in pairs, approved automatic flush bolts shall be permitted to be used, provided that the door leaf having the automatic flush bolts does not have a doorknob or surface-mounted hardware.
  4. Doors from individual dwelling or sleeping units of Group R occupancies having an occupant load of 10 or less are permitted to be equipped with a night latch, dead bolt or security chain, provided such devices are openable from the inside without the use of a key or tool.
  5. Fire doors after the minimum elevated temperature has disabled the unlatching mechanism in accordance with listed fire door test procedures.
  6. Doors serving roofs not intended to be occupied shall be permitted to be locked preventing entry to the building from the roof.
 

frankjr

Registered User
Joined
Jun 30, 2021
Messages
11
Location
Southern California (By the Big Mouse)
You can't lock someone into your building ever. There must be egress doors with panic hardware (>49 occ). It sounds like you aren't meeting code right now.

Also, mag locks are useless for security. You can literally open them with a strong pull. They're also prone to frequent malfunctions. Mag locks should only be used if there are no other alternatives. And again, they aren't for security, they only keep the honest people out.

If you want central controlled/fob access you would need electrified strikes or latches. Strikes probably won't work since the jambs are not prepped and no LV conduit is run. There are electronic latches, including panic hardware, that can be battery operated and update access control through the fob.

Code wise I believe our occ is < 50.

I appreciate the info & thumbs down on the maglocks for external doors. Honestly, my original thought was that it didn't matter if I had 100,000 lbs of holding force. If someone really wanted in, they just break the glass. Of course one way or the other, gaining entrance to the building would have triggered the burglar alarm.

Anyway...

Looks like we are going to go with Von Duprin 33A RIM Quiet Electric Latch hardware. Literature says they can be configured to electronically release & latch via access control, but more importantly anyone inside the building can "mechanically" get out if the doors happened to be locked.

Thanks again,
Frank
 
Top