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Close off locker rooms when pool is closed

Discussion in 'Door & Hardware forum *Sponsored by Allegion' started by KenH, Jan 9, 2020.

  1. KenH

    KenH Sawhorse

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    Hi folks, I have a question on a renovation of some locker rooms that serve an outdoor pool in an apartment building and there is an existing dead-end corridor condition that needs to be corrected.

    -Arlington, VA (2015 Virginia Construction Code)
    -Built around 1990 under BOCA, type I-B is the IBC equivalent. Fully sprinklered
    -Updating locker rooms for ADA/FHA compliance

    The attached file shows the configuration of doors. Currently D8 has no lock, just passage hardware. This allows people into the corridor where the locker room doors (D4, D6) are locked by single-cylinder deadbolts when the pool is closed. This creates an 85' dead end that is an issue. I was thinking that a solution would be to have a deadbolt on D8 with the signage "This door to remain unlocked when this space is occupied" per 10.10.1.9.3 exception 2.2, but I'm now seeing that this does not apply to our R-2 use group.

    Does anyone see any options in the code that would allow us to close off access to the locker rooms and pool deck outside hours of operation? Electronic access control is an option but we would prefer to avoid it if possible. Thanks in advance!
    -Ken
     

    Attached Files:

  2. LGreene

    LGreene Sawhorse
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    Hi Ken -

    I really don't like the idea of a double-cylinder deadbolt here (like the kind allowed by the section you referenced), but how about adding a deadbolt that is code-compliant? If there is no latching hardware on the door, then the deadbolt would be the one operation to unlatch the door. It would need a thumbturn that is operable without tight grasping, pinching, or twisting of the wrist, but those are readily available. The deadbolt would have to be mounted between 34-48 inches above the floor.

    To prevent people from locking the door when they shouldn't, I would use a classroom function deadbolt. From the outside, this deadbolt operates normally - lock or unlock with the key. From the inside, the thumbturn will retract the bolt (in case someone is locked inside), but it will not project the bolt (so only someone with a key can lock it).

    Here's an article with some info about deadbolts that might help: https://idighardware.com/2018/08/decoded-deadbolts-in-a-means-of-egress-october-2018/

    - Lori
     
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  3. JPohling

    JPohling Sawhorse

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    I would propose that the occupant load in this area is less than 50 so no second exit required so no dead end is possible
     
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  4. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    is occupancy used to determine maximum length of dead end corridor or is it a code max. limit?
     
  5. KenH

    KenH Sawhorse

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    Thanks Lori - I hadn't thought about just having a deadbolt on the D8 door and eliminating the passage hardware (so unlatching is still a single action). Agreed that a double-cylinder deadbolt would not be a great solution. So we would just have a single cylinder deadbolt on one side with push/pull plates and a closer, right? Is a classroom function deadbolt the same as a single-cylinder deadbolt? Just want to make sure I'm not mixing up my terminology. I really appreciate your feedback!
     
  6. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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    I concur with the great State of California!!!

    Not a dead end, you can do what you want. Except take the door off.
     
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  7. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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    Is the pool inside or outside the building??
     
  8. KenH

    KenH Sawhorse

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    The pool is outdoors in a courtyard that has egress to the ROW through the enclosure fence.
     
  9. KenH

    KenH Sawhorse

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    Hmm, interesting point that I hadn't considered. Thanks for taking a look!
     
  10. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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    Agree again, not a dead end situation


    Put those fancy card reader hardware on the door, and program to not allow access, after and before certain hours
     
  11. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    better! and insures a record of who and when it is used.
     
  12. mtlogcabin

    mtlogcabin Sawhorse

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    And the common path of travel in a sprinklered "B" occupancy can be 100 feet.
    So it is not a code violation lock the door
     
  13. LGreene

    LGreene Sawhorse
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    There are different types of deadbolts that could be considered single-cylinder deadbolts - for example, a deadbolt with a thumbturn that projects and retracts the bolt, or a deadbolt with a cylinder on the outside and nothing at all on the inside. I would specifically call out a classroom function deadbolt so you get the function where the thumbturn retracts the bolt but does not throw it. Otherwise, anyone can secure that area for "nefarious purposes," possibly even exposing the facility to liability.
     
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