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Curious if you seen....

bill1952

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Aug 12, 2021
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Clayton NY
...DWB - diagonal wood boards, not LIB - wall bracing in new construction. Working with an architect am planning on all rough sawn lumber (permitted in NYS I suspect courtesy of legislators and those small woodlot and sawmill owners who contribute to their campaigns) and this seems like easiest and least method of wall bracing. Siding is board and batten which would seem to not contribute much compared to modern sheathing and 2x6 studs are on 24" center which excludes LIB unfortunately.
 

bill1952

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Aug 12, 2021
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Clayton NY
I figure that at a full inch thick, it ought to be adequate, but an amazing lack of info and images on line.
 

e hilton

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Jul 2, 2014
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Virginia
So how does it work? Nailed to the surface of the studs? Doesn’t that interfere with the exterior plane of the house?
 

bill1952

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Clayton NY
In the past, it was the sheathing. My plan is to do 4' panels with studs and plates ripped to 5" so boards are flush with rest of framing.
 

tmurray

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Jun 10, 2011
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2,274
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NB, Canada
So how does it work? Nailed to the surface of the studs? Doesn’t that interfere with the exterior plane of the house?
Typically you will let in the studs so that the diagonal brace sits flush with the outside of the stud.

I have a couple of builders that still do this here. Not required, but they are not comfortable building without them.
 

bill1952

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Clayton NY
Not LIB, let in bracing, typically a single 1x4, but DWB, diagonal wood boards, basically one-by sheathing at an angle. I'd use the LIB but only allowed for maximum 16" stud spacing, and using 24" for simplicity if using 22" barn sash - no headers or jack studs.
 

tmurray

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2,274
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Not LIB, let in bracing, typically a single 1x4, but DWB, diagonal wood boards, basically one-by sheathing at an angle. I'd use the LIB but only allowed for maximum 16" stud spacing, and using 24" for simplicity if using 22" barn sash - no headers or jack studs.
My mistake. We don't see anyone doing these right now. My house is 60 years old and that is how it was sheathed though.
 

bill1952

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Aug 12, 2021
Messages
684
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Clayton NY
Min. 48" panel, but I see no other downside.....Doesn't even speak of nailing to plates. Although the IRC won't let you rip studs....
They're a full 6 x 2 inches so even with an inch ripped off, still more cross section.

I did think about setting them on 16" centers in braced panel areas and using LIB. Maybe a simpler solution. I could do double the amount needed and use much less material.
 

bill1952

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Aug 12, 2021
Messages
684
Location
Clayton NY
My mistake. We don't see anyone doing these right now. My house is 60 years old and that is how it was sheathed though.
Since first house in 1983 until 2019, 100+ year old houses - all rough cut - 2x4 rafters spanning 15' - all straight and square. I think part of why it appeals to me for this little "barn" that is primarily to keep snow off my cars and canoes.
 

bill1952

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Aug 12, 2021
Messages
684
Location
Clayton NY
Diagonal sheathing was the usual method before plywood became popular.
Still I wonder if anyone has seen it in "new" build in last 5 or so years. Interesting how some long ago and now rare building methods stay in the code. Went through that recently on fire door committee with wood and tin covered doors - like you use to see in old factories. Seemed one company in NYC could still produce them and occasionally had a call for a replacement. Stayed in NFPA 80.
 
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