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Definition of Structure

Discussion in 'Floodplain Management' started by jar546, Nov 22, 2019.

  1. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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    I think we all know the answer to this when it comes to the ICC codes.
    When we are talking floodplain management and FEMA, however, it is not quite the same.

    For floodplain management purposes, a structure is a walled and roofed building, including a gas or liquid storage tank, that is principally above ground, as well as a manufactured home. The terms "structure" and "building" are interchangeable in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). Residential and non-residential structures are treated differently. A residential building built in a floodplain must be elevated above the Base Flood Elevation (BFE). Non-residential buildings may be elevated or floodproofed.

    Building

    • A structure with 2 or more outside rigid walls and a fully secured roof, that is affixed to a permanent site; or
    • A manufactured home (a "manufactured home," also known as a mobile home, is a structure built on a permanent chassis, transported to its site in 1 or more sections, and affixed to a permanent foundation); or
    • A travel trailer without wheels, built on a chassis and affixed to a permanent foundation, that is regulated under the community's floodplain management and building ordinances or laws.
    "Building" does not mean a gas or liquid storage tank or a recreational vehicle, a park trailer, or other similar vehicle, except as described above.
     

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