1. ATTENTION returning members. If you are coming here from the old forum for the first time, you will need to reset you password. However, we had an email problem getting password reset links set out to a lot of the email addresses. That problem is temporarily rectified but IF you still have an issue, email me direct at info@thebuildingcodeforum.com and I will give you a temporary password.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Welcome to the new and improved Building Code Forum. We appreciate you being here and hope that you are getting the information that you need concerning all codes of the building trades. This is a free forum to the public due to the generosity of the Sawhorses, Corporate Supporters and Supporters who have upgraded their accounts. If you would like to have improved access to the forum please upgrade to Sawhorse by clicking here: Upgrades
    Dismiss Notice

Electrical Boxes and Masonry

Discussion in 'Electrician Talk' started by jar546, Apr 11, 2019.

  1. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2009
    Messages:
    6,580
    Likes Received:
    452
    Although there is nothing "wrong" with this installation, I would have done it a little differently, I would have wrapped the entire outside of the box in self stick ice and water shield and then attached it so that when I had to go back in a few years, it wasn't rotted out as bad and it would make it easier to replace if I had to.
    Thoughts?
    IMG_3755.JPG
     
  2. steveray

    steveray Sawhorse

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2009
    Messages:
    6,395
    Likes Received:
    843
    Never seen NM embedded in masonry before...Isn't the ground wire "supposed" to be wrapped the other way?
     
    Joe Engel and jar546 like this.
  3. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2009
    Messages:
    6,580
    Likes Received:
    452
    Good catch! I did not see the ground wire wrapped backwards. I missed that!

    They drilled through the block so it is not embedded. Good electricians will run the NM cable through smurf tube for the transition.
     
  4. steveray

    steveray Sawhorse

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2009
    Messages:
    6,395
    Likes Received:
    843
    Smurf tube makes sense...
     
    rogerpa and jar546 like this.
  5. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2009
    Messages:
    6,580
    Likes Received:
    452
    IMG_2996.JPG
     
  6. e hilton

    e hilton Bronze Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2014
    Messages:
    183
    Likes Received:
    34
    The ground wire ... from a practical perspective, i think the clockwise wrap was/is more important with stranded wire, so it has less tendency to come apart as the screw is turned. With a bit of care, solid wire can be successfully wrapped either way.
     
    ICE likes this.
  7. KZQuixote

    KZQuixote Sawhorse

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2010
    Messages:
    498
    Likes Received:
    1
    A problem with any selfadhesive flashing is that they don't form to complex shapes very well, especially if you're depending on it staying put after you turn your back on it. A better solution might be a rubber or plastic boot that might provide a slip plane should the box need replacement after the stucco is applied. Of course we don't build for sustainability in this country, for example, if we cared about making buildings maintainable we would never just side up to a window or door without any trim. I'm sure we all see it every day. How much does the cost of a window replacement effort go up if the carpenter has to remove the siding to change the window?
    Bill
     

Share This Page