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Failed Footer Inspection, Not allowed to pour then found this

Discussion in 'Residential Foundation Codes' started by jar546, Nov 17, 2010.

  1. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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    Footer inspection failed:

    1) No permit posted on site (one was issued)

    2) No set of approved plans on site

    3) Forms not pinned yet, still loose

    4) No provisions for bonding the rebar in the footer

    5) Job not complete and no one there

    On the way to another inspection and found this:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Mark K

    Mark K Platinum Member

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    "On the way to another inspection and found this:"

    A little unclear as to what was found. First photo is unclear but suggests that the CMU was placed on the earth and the "footing" was to be poured on the sides of the wall? Please clarify.
     
  3. rshuey

    rshuey Sawhorse

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    Nice. They pored the footer and added some block. Should be fun to demo.
     
  4. Jobsaver

    Jobsaver Sawhorse

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    Apparently, they are located in a "get it inspected if they feel like it ahj". Or, they complied with the posted corrections, and thought it okay to proceed.

    If the steel was okay at the footing inspection, and you are comfortable at this point that the bond to rebar is established, everything else can be verifed with no demolition.

    It may be an honest mistake, but these folks already have two strikes against them.
     
  5. mark handler

    mark handler Sawhorse

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    Two pieces of vertical rebar? So much for laps....
     
  6. GHRoberts

    GHRoberts Silver Member

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    Having plans on site seems to be your lack of diligence not the builders. How do you know what to inspect if you do not have a set of plans?

    I don't see it being a big deal. How many jobs have you "ok"ed the footings on and the contractors removed the rebar before pouring the concrete? (Now that I have planted this idea in your head I expect that you will stand around and watch every footing be poured. And don't leave until the concrete is hard.

    ---

    I expect whatever notes you left on site were read and the problems resolved to the builders ability. It is sort of hard for him to provide plans when he is not on the site. I guess you will have to accept that one.

    Ask the builder.
     
  7. mtlogcabin

    mtlogcabin Sawhorse

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    If that is 12 inch block then it maybe beyond the prescriptive method of the IRC 2006 TABLE R403.1. Need an engineer ?
     
  8. pwood

    pwood Platinum Member

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    george,

    i know it may be hard for you to comprehend this but it is a code requirement for the permitee to have the approved set of plans on the job at the time of inspection or a reinspection fee can be assessed. our work trucks are not rolling file cabinets:mrgreen: sheesh! jar, do whatever makes you comfortable to sign off the work completed!
     
  9. peach

    peach Sawhorse

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    "ooops, mr. inspector.. I promise not to do it again"
     
  10. Robert Ellenberg

    Robert Ellenberg Sawhorse

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    Jar,

    Several questions:

    You said you were on the way to another job and found this and then stated no one was there. It sounds like you weren't called to do an inspection.

    You said footing inspection but these are foundation walls. Did they fail the initial footing inspection, pour it and then proceed to run up the walls?

    I wasn't clear about the comment on forms being pinned. If the concrete is already poured, why would they pin them now or am I not understanding?

    No way implying you aren't right, just not clear on the details.
     
  11. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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    They called for an inspection and failed. Never heard from them again. They did not have approval to pour the footers.

    About 2 weeks later I was on my way to an inspection in the area where I had to drive right by this one. This is what I found. You are looking at the foundation going up where they never had approval for the footers to even be poured.

    Hope that clarifies it for those of you who did not get the jist of the original post.
     
  12. Uncle Bob

    Uncle Bob Sawhorse

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    When push comes to shove; they know you are not going to be able to make them tear down that wall, remove the footing and start all over. They know it and we know it; so, it becomes a case of how do you cover your butt.

    And, everyone knows an Engineer; who, for $150.00 will write a letter that the footing meets engineering requirements. You file the letter and go on to the next inspection;

    Or, you slap a stop work order on the project, stand your ground; and, send out resume's because you are not going to have that job for long.

    Uncle Bob :(
     
    #12 Uncle Bob, Nov 18, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 18, 2010
  13. RJJ

    RJJ Platinum Member

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    Well UB it depends on the town! I ask for the 150.00 letter. I would place a stop work notice and have them core the footings to assure proper concrete was placed. I would also issue a citation and drag them to the DJ for a fine. 600.00 would due!!! Next time they will clean the wax out of thier ears!
     
  14. KZQuixote

    KZQuixote Sawhorse

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    I'm with you there Uncle Bob. The stick's a good tool but if you never get the carrot out of your box of tricks you won't be around for long.

    Bill
     
  15. beach

    beach Gold Member

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    Tear it out or provide X-ray of complete footing. If I had to worry about losing my job while enforcing the code, I'd be asking if you want fries with that burger. That's why they make jack hammers and dump trucks......
     
  16. mtlogcabin

    mtlogcabin Sawhorse

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    What was the original failure/corrections?

    What is going to be placed on top? Single story? Two story?

    You may not have to tear it out to get compliance
     
  17. GHRoberts

    GHRoberts Silver Member

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    The tear out is not to ensure compliance. It is to show who is "in charge."
     
  18. GHRoberts

    GHRoberts Silver Member

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    The issue is that this was not an inspection. To expect that plans would be available whenever the inspector drives by seems a bit much. I prefer to be on site and give an oral engineering opinion that the work is proper. Others might have different opinions as to how to handle code compliance issues.
     
  19. TimNY

    TimNY Platinum Member

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    If you schedule an inspection (in this case, the original footing inspection. when there were no footings or walls existing.. yet), you should be there to meet the inspector, and you should have the approved plans with you. In some cases (and I don't know how jar works) your inspection is between 8-4 and I personally would not expect somebody to wait all day (some municipalities do), but the plans should be there. Get a piece of 3" PVC with a cap and screw it to a tree if you have to.

    I know.. I know.. 10 minutes of time and $5 in pvc is too much to ask.. that's why I didn't go so far as to say they should take a wide tip marker and write "PLANS" on the pvc.

    All of my inspections are scheduled, and with rare exception I am +/- 15 minutes. I expect the contractor to be there with the plans that bear my stamp, unless other arrangements are made. I don't think jar expected the plans to be there when he drove by (not for an inspection, but on his way to another job)-- but he didn't expect to see footings and block walls either.

    The cable TV guy can require you to be at home between 8-4, but the building inspector can't. I don't get it.
     
  20. Uncle Bob

    Uncle Bob Sawhorse

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    Rule # 1 for contractors who have screwed up: If you can't win the arguement; change the subject; and argue bout the new subject. lmao

    Uncle Bob
     

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