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Fire code ratings for fixtures and display walls

baroncasey1955

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Nov 28, 2020
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Atlanta GA
What I can gather from my findings is that it is a Type 2 construction building the retail space had sprinklers and the occupancy classification will be probably B for a small medical facility. Creating modular wood display walls that makeup patent rooms within the space not attached to the existing structure. The walls will be sprayed with Fire Protection coating giving it a 1-hour class A coating. Do you see any red flags this might be for the building inspector or fire marshal? Thanks!
 

baroncasey1955

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Nov 28, 2020
Messages
11
Location
Atlanta GA
Is the Fire Protection coating have a tested and listed for that purpose?
can you elaborate on this? It is a wood constructed display that was coated with the fire protection spray and paint. The coating and the spray have the certifications and technical data for sprayed on wood/ plywood and MDF
 

cda

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Oct 19, 2009
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Basement
Is it Firestop???

If a product has been tested/ listed

The manufacture will put in the specs

Which test/s it has undergone and passed

Normally you will see NFPA OR UL TEST with some numbers following it

like UL E84 or similar

If you can post a link to the manufacture spec sheet
 

classicT

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Aug 2, 2017
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1,669
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Washington State
Is it Firestop???

If a product has been tested/ listed

The manufacture will put in the specs

Which test/s it has undergone and passed

Normally you will see NFPA OR UL TEST with some numbers following it

like UL E84 or similar

If you can post a link to the manufacture spec sheet
No, it is obviously not a firestop. Firestopping occurs at joints and penetrations.

It is most likely an intumescent coating.

Sorry to be fickle, but it is a pet peeve of mine to use the wrong terminology for fire-resistive components. Life safety and all...
 

cda

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Oct 19, 2009
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No, it is obviously not a firestop. Firestopping occurs at joints and penetrations.

It is most likely an intumescent coating.

Sorry to be fickle, but it is a pet peeve of mine to use the wrong terminology for fire-resistive components. Life safety and all...

No the knock off

Cannot find their web site

 

Kyle B

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Jun 19, 2020
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9
Location
3085 N Saratov Way, Kuna, ID 83634
By "modular wood displays in patient rooms" I assume you mean Patient Headwalls, which house the gas outlets, flowmeters, etc. that are used around the patient bed. Some manufacturers, like Amico, sell and build headwalls that already meet the fireproof ratings/specs required for medical facilities, but when getting into building these headwall units you're also getting into NFPA 99 and medical gas installations, covered under 5.1.10.11.10.2 of the 2018 edition, because you'll have to extended the pipe length at the outlet point to accommodate the thickness of the new headwall. That component of headwall installation is almost always overlooked and will require a medical gas installer, as well as an ASSE 6040 verifier to certify the installation. It's much easier to use the premanufactured headwalls for this, building from scratch has a lot of extra steps that you could get wrong if you're not familiar with simple things like outlet spacing requirements, fire proofing requirements, etc.

Hope that helps.
 

FM William Burns

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Oct 17, 2009
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2,897
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The Mitten State
Our Homework Assignment - Let’s read IBC/IFC or NFPA1/101 applicable sections for interior wall and ceiling finishes for use/occupancy types. Continue to read section on decorative material(s) references if applicable.

For clinical occupancies where no one gets knocked out (ability for self-preservation) for surgical procedures etc. will be typically classified as a business use and you may not need to research specific health care standards like NFPA 99. If a facility is classified as a health care or ambulatory health care, in most jurisdictions NFPA 101/99 are typically the referenced code and standards due to federal regulatory rules for funding facilities. The definition sections of one’s base code or referenced standard will explain differences in use/occupancy types.

A fire regulatory official should be asking for documentation on the existing or proposed interior wall finishes and proof that the material meets the proper testing standards criteria of NFPA or ASTM as referenced for a class A/B/C interior wall, floor or ceiling finish for most areas or A/B for means of egress etc.

The documentation requested should be the actual flame spread and smoke development testing result and range figures from an accredited testing facility like UL, Interteck etc. One should not just accept a material/product’s cut/data sheets for verifying compliance since product cut/data sheets because manufacturers or suppliers cut/data sheets are not always accurate in their claims.

The contractor, supplier or design professional associated to the facility can request test results for a material or an exemplary material (since it may be by another name from the supplier) from the manufacturer of the proposed or existing material. So don’t believe a claim of lack of availability. The proof is out there..... and needed especially with decorative type materials.
 

cda

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Messages
19,607
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Basement
Homework assignment - Read IBC/IFC or NFPA1/101 applicable sections for interior wall and ceiling finishes for use/occupancy types. Continue to read decorative material(s) references if applicable.

For clinical occupancies where no one gets knocked out for surgical procedures etc. one may not need to research specific health care standards like NFPA 99 since the occupancy would be considered a business use/occupancy and not health care or ambulatory health care. The definition sections of one’s base code or referenced standard will explain differences in use/occupancy types.

A fire regulatory official should be asking for documentation on the existing or proposed interior wall finishes and proof that it meets the proper testing criteria of NFPA or ASTM as referenced for a class A/B/C interior wall, floor or ceiling finish for most areas or A/B for means of egress etc.

Documentation should be actual flame spread and smoke development testing results range figures from an accredited testing facility like UL, Interteck etc. and not just the material cut/data sheets since product cut/data sheets are not always accurate in their claims. The manufacturer of the proposed or existing material has the testing documentation or can get it. Proof is needed especially with decorative type materials.


Well FM good to see you!
 
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