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Future use areas

Discussion in 'Commercial Building Codes' started by Hyrax4978, Jul 31, 2020.

  1. Hyrax4978

    Hyrax4978 Registered User

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    I am working on a project in which the owner will only occupy about a quarter of the space.
    The remainder of which is all up in the air pending how they grow and change over the next few years.
    Any recommendations on how to classify the future uses of the area as they grow into it.
    They have ideas on what they might be, but not definite and no idea on how much of each use they might actually end up with.

    Should i classify the entire building as the same use as the part of the building they will occupy, or classify it best as they see it being used in the next few years.
     
  2. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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    1. So what occupancy type is it?

    2. Will they have access/ use of the un finished area?

    3. Fire Sprinkler system?
     
  3. Hyrax4978

    Hyrax4978 Registered User

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    They will start off with F1 use with two fire areas both under 12,000 sf. The future will either be F1, F2 or B uses depending on how things grow and change. No sprinklers.
     
  4. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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    2. Will they have access/ use of the un finished area?
     
  5. Rick18071

    Rick18071 Sawhorse

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    Is this a new building? Do it like a shopping center. One permit for shell and then a separate permit for one tenant fit-out.
     
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  6. Hyrax4978

    Hyrax4978 Registered User

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    Sorry, yes they will have access. they will occupy about half of one fire area, and the other fire area will have a couple fire shutters.
     
  7. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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    If they have access, they are going to use it, so to me have them label the use.

    And meet minimum code

    Add the comment, Once in the future the area is used for something, plans and permit are required prior to remodel/ use
     
  8. Tim Mailloux

    Tim Mailloux Registered User

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    What is the construction type?
     
  9. ADAguy

    ADAguy Registered User

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    As usual, It depends.
     
  10. steveray

    steveray Sawhorse

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    I'd have to see a floor plan, but I'd probably call it all F1 or S1....A change of use to B should be simpler than going the other way but it might not make much difference. Bathrooms might be the biggest challenge.
     
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  11. Ty J.

    Ty J. Sawhorse

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    From a code analysis perspective, you have to assign as use to determine the building is within its allowable area. For this purpose, F-1, S-1, M, and B are all pretty similar, so doubtful much impact if a change of use between one of these.

    May ask the AHJ if they do "shell-only" permits. We will offer this for strip malls and similar buildings where the full build out is not completed and the future use is still a bit fluid. A tenant improvement plan is required prior to a CO.
     
  12. fatboy

    fatboy Administrator

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    Core and shell with tenant finishes, we see it all the time. No reason not to apply it to a single user application.
     
  13. Mark K

    Mark K Platinum Member

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    There is more to consider than fire rating. Consider the impact of different occupancies on risk category and design live load. Will there be occupancies associated with hazardous materials.

    Talk to the design team. The future uses may have an impact on the structural system. For example a structural steel frame may make it easier to accommodate future floor openings or new concentrated loads.
     
  14. steveray

    steveray Sawhorse

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    And when the IECC changes and you have to upgrade the insulation and windows in the shell building because it never had a CO?
     

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