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Hi

ansu

Registered User
Joined
Nov 16, 2020
Messages
7
Location
Portland, OR
Hi all, I'm new here (duh)

I saw that there was a building inspection program at my community college, and I'm thinking about taking it. However, it recommends that you have construction experience which I don't have.
I'm only 17, so I would be 19 when I start looking for a job (It's a 2 year program)
Also, I am a girl.
I'm worried those three things might make it more difficult for me, but I'm hoping that if I work hard and have confidence in myself, others will have confidence in me.
I was also considering becoming a home inspector, but I like that being a building inspector allows you to help mitigate problems before they even happen, and it seems like a path with more opportunity
 
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cda

Sawhorse 123
Joined
Oct 19, 2009
Messages
19,058
Location
Basement
Hi all, I'm new here (duh)

I saw that there was a building inspection program at my community college, and I'm thinking about taking it. However, it recommends that you have construction experience which I don't have.
I'm only 17, so I would be 19 when I start looking for a job (It's a 2 year program)
Also, I am a girl.
I'm worried those three things might make it more difficult for me, but I'm hoping that if I work hard and have confidence in myself, others will have confidence in me.
I was also considering becoming a home inspector, but I like that being a building inspector allows you to help mitigate problems before they even happen, and it seems like a path with more opportunity


Go for it. Learn what is in the books, and once in the field, you will see what the books are trying to say.

The course work is more code oriented, which is good, but codes are not the easiest to read and understand. Yes some type of construction helps understand the concepts.

So the other suggestion, besides go for it, is get involved in construction in some manner, even if it is cleaning up a job site, or carrying supplies, and work yourself into doing some of the work.

Or, you must have a least one relative that does some type of plumbing, electric or whatever, tag along and watch or fetch and watch.
 

ansu

Registered User
Joined
Nov 16, 2020
Messages
7
Location
Portland, OR
Thank you for your response and the much needed advice! I'll definitely try to get some experience then
 

Pcinspector1

Platinum Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2009
Messages
3,450
Location
MID WEST
ansu,

See if you have a local Habitat for Humanity program near you. You can volunteer, get some free education from others you work with and provide a home for someone in need. In return you will pick up some construction terminology that will help you.
 

ansu

Registered User
Joined
Nov 16, 2020
Messages
7
Location
Portland, OR
ansu,

See if you have a local Habitat for Humanity program near you. You can volunteer, get some free education from others you work with and provide a home for someone in need. In return you will pick up some construction terminology that will help you.
Thank you! There is and that definitely sounds like something I'd like to do.
 

ICE

Moderator
Joined
Jun 23, 2011
Messages
9,264
Location
California concrete jungle
Years ago I attended a building inspection program at a community college. There were several ladies also in attendance. I only kept track of one lady and she went on to become an important person at the San Mateo County Building Dept. Prior to becoming a building inspector she drove a UPS delivery truck.
 

Inspector Gift

Sawhorse - Made in USA
Joined
Oct 17, 2009
Messages
323
Location
City of Sandy, Oregon
ANSU,

As an alumni of PCC's Building Inspection Technology Degree program, I would love to help you out. As someone who has worked in residential and commercial construction for 26+ years, and then studied to become an inspector and building official, I have a fair grasp of what makes a good inspector, plans examiner, or code official. I am currently employed by the City of Sandy, east of Portland. If you want to contact me, please do. And we can chat about your goals and plans. This is a GREAT Profession and career. There are many other alumni working in the Portland area, and I hope that you can talk with some of them, also.

Portland Community College also has an excellent construction degree program. If you want to be a good inspector, you should fully understand what you are inspecting. Just knowing what the code book says, without understanding that purpose and fundamental principles behind the code, prevents an inspector from determining the difference from sub-standard and acceptable practical application of the code. Shear wall nailing and sheetrock nailing are two examples where the exact letter of the code is not enforced strictly. I've never seen an inspector using a ladder to inspect the shear nailing of the 2nd story exterior walls.


As much as I love my career, I would hate to see you study for something that you won't succeed at due to lack of practical experience and understanding. If at all possible, I encourage a young college students to become a carpenters, electricians, plumbers, HVAC technicians, or if they are exceptionally bright, architects or engineers.

OK... you can disregard that or not... But did you know PCC also has engineering and architectural degree programs?
 

ansu

Registered User
Joined
Nov 16, 2020
Messages
7
Location
Portland, OR
ANSU,

As an alumni of PCC's Building Inspection Technology Degree program, I would love to help you out. As someone who has worked in residential and commercial construction for 26+ years, and then studied to become an inspector and building official, I have a fair grasp of what makes a good inspector, plans examiner, or code official. I am currently employed by the City of Sandy, east of Portland. If you want to contact me, please do. And we can chat about your goals and plans. This is a GREAT Profession and career. There are many other alumni working in the Portland area, and I hope that you can talk with some of them, also.

Portland Community College also has an excellent construction degree program. If you want to be a good inspector, you should fully understand what you are inspecting. Just knowing what the code book says, without understanding that purpose and fundamental principles behind the code, prevents an inspector from determining the difference from sub-standard and acceptable practical application of the code. Shear wall nailing and sheetrock nailing are two examples where the exact letter of the code is not enforced strictly. I've never seen an inspector using a ladder to inspect the shear nailing of the 2nd story exterior walls.


As much as I love my career, I would hate to see you study for something that you won't succeed at due to lack of practical experience and understanding. If at all possible, I encourage a young college students to become a carpenters, electricians, plumbers, HVAC technicians, or if they are exceptionally bright, architects or engineers.

OK... you can disregard that or not... But did you know PCC also has engineering and architectural degree programs?
Wow, I was never expecting to get this much useful advice!
I definitely see what you are saying about needing extensive experience before pursusing inspection, it definitely seems crazy to tell people what to do when you don't even know what you're doing!!
 

ansu

Registered User
Joined
Nov 16, 2020
Messages
7
Location
Portland, OR
ANSU,

As an alumni of PCC's Building Inspection Technology Degree program, I would love to help you out. As someone who has worked in residential and commercial construction for 26+ years, and then studied to become an inspector and building official, I have a fair grasp of what makes a good inspector, plans examiner, or code official. I am currently employed by the City of Sandy, east of Portland. If you want to contact me, please do. And we can chat about your goals and plans. This is a GREAT Profession and career. There are many other alumni working in the Portland area, and I hope that you can talk with some of them, also.

Portland Community College also has an excellent construction degree program. If you want to be a good inspector, you should fully understand what you are inspecting. Just knowing what the code book says, without understanding that purpose and fundamental principles behind the code, prevents an inspector from determining the difference from sub-standard and acceptable practical application of the code. Shear wall nailing and sheetrock nailing are two examples where the exact letter of the code is not enforced strictly. I've never seen an inspector using a ladder to inspect the shear nailing of the 2nd story exterior walls.


As much as I love my career, I would hate to see you study for something that you won't succeed at due to lack of practical experience and understanding. If at all possible, I encourage a young college students to become a carpenters, electricians, plumbers, HVAC technicians, or if they are exceptionally bright, architects or engineers.

OK... you can disregard that or not... But did you know PCC also has engineering and architectural degree programs?
I don't quite have the mind for engineering, and I don't want an office job so I don't think those other options are for me.
I was considering the construction program at PCC as well so perhaps I will pursue that first
 

ansu

Registered User
Joined
Nov 16, 2020
Messages
7
Location
Portland, OR
Years ago I attended a building inspection program at a community college. There were several ladies also in attendance. I only kept track of one lady and she went on to become an important person at the San Mateo County Building Dept. Prior to becoming a building inspector she drove a UPS delivery truck.
Good to know :)
 

VillageInspector

Sawhorse
Joined
Feb 9, 2010
Messages
203
Location
Dutchess County, New York, United States
I think the fact that you are young and female are truly assets and I think you would be wise to take up some of the offers being made here. I can't speak for anywhere other than New York State but here you must have a certain amount of years in a construction field of some sort. You might want to ascertain what the minimum requirements are out there to be sure you can meet them before you commit. All the best in your decisions and I will say I started this career after retiring from the fire service and I must say that this job is every bit as rewarding at times as the fire service was.
 
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