1. Welcome to the new and improved Building Code Forum. We appreciate you being here and hope that you are getting the information that you need concerning all codes of the building trades. This is a free forum to the public due to the generosity of the Sawhorses, Corporate Supporters and Supporters who have upgraded their accounts. If you would like to have improved access to the forum please upgrade to Sawhorse by clicking here: Upgrades
    Dismiss Notice

Kitchen of a Bed & Breakfast

Discussion in 'Electrical Codes' started by jar546, Jan 14, 2020.

  1. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2009
    Messages:
    7,645
    Likes Received:
    705
    Would the kitchen of a bed and breakfast (R1) be considered a commercial kitchen since there is only one which cooks for all guest rooms?
     
  2. e hilton

    e hilton Bronze Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2014
    Messages:
    962
    Likes Received:
    214
    Whats the difference between that, and a kitchen for a house with six bedrooms and lots of kids? I have a good friend that had 7 brothers ... 8 boys in all. I imagine there was a lot of food getting prepared when they were teens.
     
  3. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2009
    Messages:
    7,645
    Likes Received:
    705
    Agree. Looking for a legal definition as it relates to codes and not to similar circumstance.
     
  4. cda

    cda Sawhorse

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2009
    Messages:
    17,946
    Likes Received:
    1,240
    I would say could be

    Nice answer

    If I saw plans for a new b b and the kitchen looked like you could make anything a restaurant could, large commercial burner stove, deep fat fryers, commercial oven etc
     
  5. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2009
    Messages:
    7,645
    Likes Received:
    705
    Well I have my answer for my situation because the mechanical plans examiner is considering it commercial so for electrical plan review I will too.
     
  6. JCraver

    JCraver Sawhorse

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    705
    Likes Received:
    262
    If submitted under IRC and I didn't know it was a b&b then no. If submitted under IBC then I think it'd be hard to get out of it.
     
    Msradell likes this.
  7. Ty J.

    Ty J. Sawhorse

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2017
    Messages:
    1,140
    Likes Received:
    416
    Domestic appliances or commercial appliances?

    I think we have beat this horse to death regarding fire stations too.
     
  8. steveray

    steveray Sawhorse

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2009
    Messages:
    7,117
    Likes Received:
    1,056
    From the IMC....If it is not IRC, it is commercial...

    COMMERCIAL COOKING APPLIANCES. Appliances
    used in a commercial food service establishment
    for heating
    or cooking food and which produce grease vapors, steam,
    fumes, smoke or odors that are required to be removed
    through a local exhaust ventilation system. Such appliances
    include deep fat fryers; upright broilers; griddles; broilers;
    steam-jacketed kettles; hot-top ranges; under-fired broilers
    (charbroilers); ovens; barbecues; rotisseries; and similar
    appliances. For the purpose of this definition, a food service
    establishment shall include any building or a portion thereof
    used for the preparation and serving of food.
     
  9. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2009
    Messages:
    7,645
    Likes Received:
    705
    So can a declared R1 be IRC?
     
  10. steveray

    steveray Sawhorse

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2009
    Messages:
    7,117
    Likes Received:
    1,056
    Nope....CT has a bunch of B&B amendments where we keep them in IRC....
     
  11. Builder Bob

    Builder Bob Sawhorse

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2009
    Messages:
    2,346
    Likes Received:
    368
    your answer will vary state by state as B N B may have specific state laws/ statues/ regulations that pertain to them.
     
  12. ADAguy

    ADAguy Registered User

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2013
    Messages:
    4,537
    Likes Received:
    433
    A place of transient occupancy, a place of business
     
  13. steveray

    steveray Sawhorse

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2009
    Messages:
    7,117
    Likes Received:
    1,056
    Jeff...What part of the NEC specifically are you looking at? I don't think they use "commercial"....Isn't it "dwelling unit" or sleeping or non? 210.8 is dwelling unit or non-dwelling unit...
     
  14. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2009
    Messages:
    7,645
    Likes Received:
    705
    There are the GFCI requirements for one that differ between residential and commercial along with the EF and hood requirements for starters.
     
  15. mark handler

    mark handler Sawhorse

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2009
    Messages:
    10,658
    Likes Received:
    902
    I know CA is a bit different but:
    CBC 310.2 Residential Group R-1- Boarding houses (transient) with more than 10 occupants
    CBC 310.4 Residential Group R-3- Boarding houses (nontransient)
    CBC 310.4.2 Lodging houses- Owner-occupied lodging houses with five or fewer guest rooms and 10 or fewer total occupants shall be permitted to be constructed in accordance with the California Residential Code.


    CBC Section 202 Definitions: TRANSIENT LODGING. A building or facility containing one or more guest room(s) for sleeping that provides accommodations that are primarily short-term in nature (generally 30 days or less). Transient lodging does not include residential dwelling units intended to be used as a residence, inpatient medical care facilities, licensed long term care facilities, detention or correctional facilities, or private buildings or facilities that contain no more than five rooms for rent or hire and that are actually occupied by the proprietor as the residence of such proprietor.
     
    ADAguy likes this.

Share This Page