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Joe.B

Registered User
Joined
Dec 4, 2020
Messages
458
Location
Myrtletown Ca
Nice, good tip. Thanks!

I also release some air after the test and when asked why I say it's to make sure the needle actually moves, which is true, but actually it's to get an idea of how much volume is actually being tested. It's only happened once, but one time I was witnessing a gas pressure test that was supposed to be the whole building, when I released some air the needle dropped all the way to zero practically instantaneously. Turns out they had only a 10" piece of pipe with a cap jammed in the wall under test. Fail!
 

Rick18071

Sawhorse
Joined
Nov 28, 2009
Messages
3,235
Location
Poconos/eastern PA
Had the same thing on a drain line. The first inspection had a frozen gauge. Made them wait a week to the 3rd inspection which passed.
 

ICE

Moderator
Joined
Jun 23, 2011
Messages
9,909
Location
California concrete jungle
An old timer told me to always check for a sulfur smell. I thought he was talking about the stink put in natural gas but he meant road flair. I seems that a small leak can be hidden by putting a piece of road flair in the pipe and lighting it on fire. The gauge goes on while the flair is burning and the gasses given off by the burning flair will seal a small leak.

I too have encountered frozen gauges. It's only been a few times and they act surprised. The most usual mistake is a 100 lb. psi gauge. I have seen those and maxed out.
 
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