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Portland Street lights go LED

Discussion in 'Green / Leed' started by jeffc, May 30, 2013.

  1. jeffc

    jeffc Bronze Member

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  2. Coug Dad

    Coug Dad Platinum Member

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    They installed some of those here. The problem is that the LED's do not generate enough heat to melt the snow and ice in the winter so the lights get blocked.
     
  3. jeffc

    jeffc Bronze Member

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    I hear that is the case with traffic lights as well. Also, if you buy LED lights, I would recommend that they are certified by an independent organization like Lighting Design Lab or Lighting Design Consortium. Many LED products don’t have the stated light output or don’t last as long as they state.
     
  4. ICE

    ICE Sawhorse

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    It seems wrong that we light all the streets in all of the cities all night long for a few people. They should all be on motion sensors like our front porches.
     
  5. fatboy

    fatboy Administrator

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    That would be awesome........@ at Coug Dad..........that would be a problem here.

    Glad to see you back.
     
  6. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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    There is a big movement to do this all over the country for the past 2 years. There are programs through some POCOs that rebate municipalities for doing so. I never thought about the snow issue but how can the snow accumulate on the bottom?
     
  7. globe trekker

    globe trekker Sawhorse

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    Freezing rain can leave a sheet over the lens, and be a cooler surface upon which more humiditycan collect (i.e. - snow / ice crystals).

    .
     
  8. conarb

    conarb Sawhorse

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    Roger Pielke is a well known climate scientist, usually on the side of the environmentalists.

    ¹ The Unholy Alliance between Philips and the Greens – A Guest Weblog by Joost van Kasteren and Henk Tennekes | Climate Science: Roger Pielke Sr.
     
  9. jeffc

    jeffc Bronze Member

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    Conarb, The article you referred to has many opinions expressed but is short on facts. For facts, Wikipedia is a good start, "Incandescent bulbs are much less efficient than most other types of lighting; most incandescent bulbs convert less than 5% of the energy they use into visible light[1] (with the remaining energy being converted into heat). The luminous efficacy of a typical incandescent bulb is 16 lumens per watt, compared to the 60 lm/W of a compact fluorescent bulb." I could reference several people to confirm that energy efficient lights are cost effective but I think discussion should transcend opinions and be a fact based. The lamps do have mercury but if you are an area that generates electricity from coal, you are releasing more mercury into the atmosphere from burning the extra coal to power the less efficient lamp than what is contained in the lamp (Are Compact Fluorescent Lightbulbs Dangerous?: Scientific American). The article mentions that incandescent lights are 100% efficient. Sure the heat can used to heat the building but what if you are in an area that needs air conditioning? These lamps would put an addition load on the A/C system.
     
  10. conarb

    conarb Sawhorse

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    I can't find a Canadian study that I saw about 10 years ago, the study concluded in cold climates like most of Canada incandescents were a better choice than CFLs since all energy is expended as light or heat, the heat offsetting heating costs.

    Another thing that I've always wondered about was someetime in the 70s they added strings of lights to the Bay Bridge to make it look pretty, Oakland also added lights encircling Lale Merritt in the center of the city. After this whole environmental craze started and they required that the citizenry convert to CFLs the Bay Bridge and Lake Merritt continued to burn brightly, I lived above the Bay and had a view of San Francisco that included the pretty lights. We have now built a new half of the Bay Bridge replete with a full complement of LED lights, in fact a lighting artiest has

    for a few years to attract tourists and presumably fill the government coffers.
     
  11. Anna Sanders

    Anna Sanders Registered User

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    Are they using Dynamo for these baby lights?
     
  12. tmurray

    tmurray Sawhorse

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    I know this is an old post...

    The study you are referring to was completed by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (crown corp owned by the federal government). CMHC owns a pair of test houses that sit side by side and are identical. They put incandescents in one building and ran CFLs in the other building. after one calender year, and extrapolating out for the lifespan of a CFL bulb, it indicated a savings of $1 for the life of a CFL bulb. That's assuming they last as long as they are supposed to. Which they don't because people are supposed to wear gloves when they are installing them to avoid leaving oil on the bulb and creating a hot spot.

    I don't know that they repeated the study with LED bulbs.
     
    jeffc likes this.

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