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Rebar too close to the outside

jar546

Chief Cook & Bottlewasher
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Last two jobs that had a third party inspector I found the dudes in the job trailer, hope their giving them the report.

I'm a bit paranoid of this relationship that the contractors have with the third party guys?
You have every right to be concerned about the relationship between private providers and their relationship with the contractors. If the inspector upsets who is paying them, they could be replaced.
 

Mark K

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If the inspector is imposing a 3" cover to all situations then he is not enforcing the building code. Review ACI 318.

This could result in a safety concern in some instances if the engineer assumed the code required cover would be complied with.
 

Joe.B

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If the inspector is imposing a 3" cover to all situations then he is not enforcing the building code. Review ACI 318.

This could result in a safety concern in some instances if the engineer assumed the code required cover would be complied with.
I did not say I was "imposing" a 3" cover to all situations. I said that's generally what I'm looking for. I should have specified that's what I'm looking for in foundation footings of standard residential construction. Most situations that involve various different applications of cover requirements also involve special inspections and an Engineer would be supervising the work.

I don't like to second guess Engineer's who are supervising their own designs, or performing special inspections. Take it easy man, this isn't a battle unless you make it one.
 

Mark K

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The job of the building department is to enforce the building code. I am not aware of any code provision that allows them to delegate that task to others such as special inspectors.

If the building department inspector does not have the time to do his work his should not be used as an excuse to try to make it somebody else responsible.

With regards 3rd party inspectors, the contractor is not allowed to hire special inspectors.
 

classicT

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I am not aware of any code provision that allows them to delegate that task to others such as special inspectors.
Here you go Mark. Here is the code section that specifically allows an AHJ to delegate to a special inspector.

[A] 110.4 Inspection Agencies
The building official is authorized to accept reports of approved inspection agencies, provided that such agencies satisfy the requirements as to qualifications and reliability.
 

classicT

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I did not say I was "imposing" a 3" cover to all situations. I said that's generally what I'm looking for. I should have specified that's what I'm looking for in foundation footings of standard residential construction. Most situations that involve various different applications of cover requirements also involve special inspections and an Engineer would be supervising the work.

I don't like to second guess Engineer's who are supervising their own designs, or performing special inspections. Take it easy man, this isn't a battle unless you make it one.
Engineers should not be providing Special Inspection on their own projects. Special inspectors should be hired by the building owner.

1703.1.1 Independence
An approved agency shall be objective, competent and independent from the contractor responsible for the work being inspected. The agency shall disclose to the building official and the registered design professional in responsible charge possible conflicts of interest so that objectivity can be confirmed.

[A] APPROVED AGENCY. An established and recognized agency that is regularly engaged in conducting tests, furnishing inspection services or furnishing product certification where such agency has been approved by the building official.
 

Pcinspector1

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If the building department inspector does not have the time to do his work his should not be used as an excuse to try to make it somebody else responsible.

I guess I'll have to go learn how to weld and get certified to do welding inspections....I sure like giving that inspection to someone who knows what he's doing?

Wow, I didn't know how incompetent I was and that I was pawning off my job to someone else. Who wrote this code book?

Man this inspection stuff is hard!
 

Joe.B

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Engineers should not be providing Special Inspection on their own projects. Special inspectors should be hired by the building owner.

1703.1.1 Independence
An approved agency shall be objective, competent and independent from the contractor responsible for the work being inspected. The agency shall disclose to the building official and the registered design professional in responsible charge possible conflicts of interest so that objectivity can be confirmed.

[A] APPROVED AGENCY. An established and recognized agency that is regularly engaged in conducting tests, furnishing inspection services or furnishing product certification where such agency has been approved by the building official.
Again, that's not what I said. I was referring to either an engineer who is overseeing the work performed under their design, or an engineer who is performing special inspections. Geeze, what's the deal here? Are you here to take out your frustrations or are you here learn like the rest of us?
 

Joe.B

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Again, that's not what I said. I was referring to either an engineer who is overseeing the work performed under their design, or an engineer who is performing special inspections. Geeze, what's the deal here? Are you here to take out your frustrations or are you here learn like the rest of us?
Sorry, probably taken out of context. You were probably just clarifying.
 

classicT

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Again, that's not what I said. I was referring to either an engineer who is overseeing the work performed under their design, or an engineer who is performing special inspections. Geeze, what's the deal here? Are you here to take out your frustrations or are you here learn like the rest of us?
Sorry, probably taken out of context. You were probably just clarifying.
Yup... sorry for any confusion.
 

Mark K

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Since the building code directly addresses the issue of welding inspections the building code does not contemplate that the building department would do welding inspections but it does have provisions that are assumed will be done by the building department inspectors.

The last paragraph of Section 1704.2.1 makes it clear that there is no prohibition for engineers doing special inspections. Remember that the engineer is a consultant or sub-consultant retained by the building owner. Design build gets a little murky.

The proposed interpretation of Section 110.4 is I believe unduly expansive. Since Section 1704. addresses special inspections and special inspectors Section 110.4 is not needed.
 

Joe.B

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Since the building code directly addresses the issue of welding inspections the building code does not contemplate that the building department would do welding inspections but it does have provisions that are assumed will be done by the building department inspectors.

The last paragraph of Section 1704.2.1 makes it clear that there is no prohibition for engineers doing special inspections. Remember that the engineer is a consultant or sub-consultant retained by the building owner. Design build gets a little murky.

The proposed interpretation of Section 110.4 is I believe unduly expansive. Since Section 1704. addresses special inspections and special inspectors Section 110.4 is not needed.
Chapter 1 is Scope and Administration, and 110.4 says the BO is "authorized to accept reports" which is the administrative section that allows 1704 to even exist. How is that unduly expansive? Or is that just, like, your opinion, man.
 

Mark K

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So a code provision cannot exist unless the administrative section allows it to exist? This I find to be a unique interpretation.
 

Joe.B

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"Scope and Administration." It defines the scope of what the code can be applied to, and how to administer it. I don't think that's a unique interpretation, that's just what it is. For a code official, code administrator, authority having jurisdiction, etc. it's probably the most important section to read, understand, and re-read again. But that's just my personal opinion, great topic for discussion though.
 

ICE

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1704.2.1
The registered design professional in responsible charge and engineers of record involved in the design of the project are permitted to act as the approved agency and their personnel are permitted to act as special inspectors for the work designed by them, provided they qualify as special inspectors.

An engineering/architecture registration is not an acceptable qualification for a special inspector in our jurisdiction. That's not to say that such would disqualify an individual to function as a special inspector....there's just a lot more to it than that. There's ICC certification and an interview process to get through....and would you care to take a guess as to who conducts the interviews?
 
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jar546

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For threshold buildings in Florida, an engineer has to be licensed as a threshold inspector or she/he cannot perform inspections. Just being an engineer or architect does not give you authorization to perform inspections on threshold buildings
 

steveray

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West of the river CT
I gotta say, I am with Mark....With the ICE topper that is....IF...they are qualified, the designer can be the SI....The contractor can not be....The theory being, that the designer is an agent of the owner same as the SI....
 

ICE

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The job was a university library. The structure was mostly concrete. The plans steel details were voluminous. The approved special inspector was an engineer from somewhere in Europe. He was trying to get a credential as an engineer in the USA but in the meantime he was an extremely meticulous special inspector. I was thankful to have him.

The first special inspector was a slug. I showed up for the placing of concrete for caissons. The workmen were preparing to fill hole #3 of about 70. It was 45' deep and I cant recall the diameter. Before they started I dropped a rock....I heard it hit water. I determined that there was 8' of water.

The special inspector was sitting in a car. I asked him if he had a clue....he did not. The work stopped. Two caissons were discounted. The job languished for a few weeks as they waited for the water table to drop...which it did not. They then brought in massive trash pumps. As the water came out the walls of the caisson collapsed creating huge void that had to be filled with concrete.

I thought that a tremie and the correct concrete mixture could push the water out. They did not agree and what with me being a new inspector, I sat back and observed. It was a localized problem that affected about ten caissons. They required double and triple the amount of concrete. The caissons did not reach bedrock. I asked the engineer to analyze the fact that one corner of the building had such a huge weight compared to the rest of the building. I was the crazy new inspector....so why not.
 
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