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The Official Changes to the 2020 NEC Thread

Discussion in 'Electrical Codes' started by jar546, Aug 5, 2019.

  1. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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    I would like to use this thread to post and discuss upcoming changes to the 2020 NFPA 70, also known as the NEC. Please post new information and comment below. Let's get started:
     
  2. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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    I'll start. First of all, Chapter 3 has been almost completely revamped. This is a new and improved Chapter 3 of the 2020 NEC. The wire size/amperage chart for dwelling units is back in combination with relevant code text. Now Table 310.12 The wire size charts have been completely renumbered too. Keep an eye out for some of the changes. NEC Section 310 will probably have the most significant changes. No more Table 310.15(B)(16). It will not just be Table 310.16 and the next table will be Table 310.17 and so on, up to Table 310.21. Stay tuned for more and if you are aware of any more, feel free to post them here.
     
  3. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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    Get ready to require GFCI protection for dryers and ranges, (yes 220v receptacles) in dwelling units. Removed is the 15-20A part. It does not matter anymore.
     
    #3 jar546, Aug 5, 2019
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2019
  4. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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    NEC 230.67 or was it 37. Not sure. Anyway, Surge protection required at the service for dwellings. More to come.
     
  5. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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    NEC 110.26 has now added language that prohibits an open door from a piece of large electrical equipment from impeding an exit/egress door. Here is the verbiage.

    Open equipment doors shall not impede the the entry to or egress from the working space.
     
  6. Msradell

    Msradell Sawhorse

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    What's the source of some of these changes? Some of them seem completely ridiculous and just a good way to spend money without accomplishing anything. I'm especially thinking about the GFI circuit for dryers and ranges. Also, the whole dwelling Surge Suppression seems like something that's being pushed by insurance companies and/or equipment suppliers.
     
  7. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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    You can find them on the NFPA website for the 1st and 2nd drafts and the reports from the code panels. In addition, there has been some reporting from the meetings.
     
  8. steveray

    steveray Sawhorse

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    The people that sell electrical stuff for the most part.....
     
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  9. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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    Although they may have some influence, this is not true.
     
  10. Pcinspector1

    Pcinspector1 Platinum Member

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    Jar, Couldn't we just stop all the individual receptacle changes and do the protection in the panel? Isn't the technology there?

    Is it possible it could be a push on the cost? Seams it always becomes a increase in cost to the industry.
     
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  11. Msradell

    Msradell Sawhorse

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    Yes, I write you can find them there, my question really was where is he push for these changes coming from? It seems like every time we turn around electrical codes are changing to make things much more expensive.
     
  12. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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    Some people thought that the tamper-resistant receptacles requirements were pushed by the manufacturers, when, in fact, the CPSC, a government entity lobbied for those changes with over 10 years of emergency room date for children under the age of 8. It had nothing to do with the manufacturers. There is perception and there is reality.
     

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