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tonyflux

Registered User
Joined
Nov 2, 2020
Messages
9
Location
United States
Hello,
I am looking to calculate the HVAC size for a fitness center in Orlando, Florida. I appreciate it if you can provide a link to guidance in calculations for a GYM.
It will be AHU on a flat roof.

Thanks
 

tonyflux

Registered User
Joined
Nov 2, 2020
Messages
9
Location
United States
Hello,
I am looking to calculate the HVAC size for a fitness center in Orlando, Florida. I appreciate it if you can provide a link to guidance in calculations for a GYM.
It will be AHU on a flat roof.

Thank
Hello,
I am looking to calculate the HVAC size for a fitness center in Orlando, Florida. I appreciate it if you can provide a link to guidance in calculations for a GYM.
It will be AHU on a flat roof.

Thanks
It is small 3000 SF, part of a abuilding
 

Paul Sweet

Sawhorse
Joined
Oct 17, 2009
Messages
1,519
Location
Richmond, VA
You need the U-values for all the envelope (walls, floor or perimeter, doors, windows, roof), areas of glass facing east, west, or south (for solar gain), and number of occupants (to determine body heat gain and ventilation). My guess based only on area would be somewhere in the range of 5 to 15 tons.
 

tmurray

Registered User
Joined
Jun 10, 2011
Messages
2,003
Location
NB, Canada
I feel like you are out of your depth.

If not, a good place to start would be the ASHRAE Fundamentals textbook.
 

mp25

Registered User
Joined
Jun 2, 2016
Messages
92
Location
Illinois
ASHRAE is a good one, I've used ACCA Manual J - They have some speedsheets that can be used in certain circumstances. A gym use is unique due to the activity taking place and how much heat and moisture is generated, and if you have a pool that further adds to complexity. As CDA suggested, a professional is a way to go in this situation.
 

Bryant

Registered User
Joined
Dec 19, 2018
Messages
102
Location
Virginia
Latent heat as in lots of bodies, that is a difficult number to derive at. I think a standing body is 50 BTU's an hour...Though I agree in that environment there are lots of little things that will add up and change the numbers. I concur, ASHRAE would be the place to go.
 

Paul Sweet

Sawhorse
Joined
Oct 17, 2009
Messages
1,519
Location
Richmond, VA
Office work is 400 BTUH per person. A gym would probably vary from around 800 BTUH for light exercise to keep limber to 1800 BTUH for more strenuous exercise.

NOTE: this table is in Watts, multiply by 3.4 to get BTUH.
 

Bryant

Registered User
Joined
Dec 19, 2018
Messages
102
Location
Virginia
Office work is 400 BTUH per person. A gym would probably vary from around 800 BTUH for light exercise to keep limber to 1800 BTUH for more strenuous exercise.

NOTE: this table is in Watts, multiply by 3.4 to get BTUH.
I thought 500 BTU's put stupidly put down 50, thanks, I knew It was a littler hotter than expected....
 

Mech

Registered User
Joined
Oct 30, 2009
Messages
904
Location
Eastern PA
There are latent heat and sensible heat components given off by people. The designer needs to take that into account. If the HVAC equipment does not provide sufficient latent heat cooling, there could be humidity problems. If not enough sensible cooling, then it could be too warm or hot.

ASHRAE had a table indicating the heat generated by people for various activities - sitting, light office work, standing, walking, heavy work, eating (probably accounts for hot food), etc.
 
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