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Inspector jobs

Tkosinski2

Registered User
Joined
Jan 11, 2017
Messages
17
Location
San Pedro
I use the icc website for cali jobs. Applied for a bunch of them, nothing yet. If you pass an icc test do you automatically get membership?
 

mtlogcabin

Sawhorse
Joined
Oct 17, 2009
Messages
7,979
Location
Big Sky Country
Personality and how you will "fit" into the existing organization is more important to me than the number of certs or the amount of experience you have.
I can and will train anybody who wants to learn. I can not train personalities.

The more you show your willingness to learn on your own that speak volumes to most of us.
Are you willing to relocate. A smaller jurisdiction might be a better start
 

linnrg

Sawhorse
Joined
Mar 17, 2015
Messages
517
Location
Sterling Alaska
I would say that all of your life experience applies not just the certs and I am in agreement with mtlogcabin. Most of the people on here either spent time in the construction fields and then transitioned to the inspector role. Some came from the design side to the inspection field. If you want to eventually get to the inspection career I would try to work for the best construction company you can and then be their best performer.
As has been stated this field has its special times when either politics get involved or clients relations are such that it can be a pain. For the most part it is a good career. The larger departments allows for specialty inspection categories, the smaller require real broad detailed knowledge in many disciplines. To do this well you will have to get it into your brain that you must press yourself to learn all the time. The codes have lots of nuances that you have to untangle then you get to the field where you need to know what you are looking at. I would bet that all of us could tell you stories of our past ignorance but we somehow get past it by becoming better. That's why most of us are paying to be here on this forum - to learn what we don't know and find out what others think is the real interpretation. We also have a little bit of fun too.

Besides the code books and cert studying you are doing I would suggest reading a book called "what color is your parachute". It gives advise on resumes, job application and the scary odds, the resume weeding, the interview process etc. It is updated I think yearly to reflect today's career paths. I read it probably 30 years ago and it left an impression on me. I can tell you that after I polished my resume it did change my outcomes in terms of getting job offers. Today's digital environment has changed the game but me thinks taking a resume by hand and leaving your foot in the door so it can't close may still work.

Good luck
 

Tkosinski2

Registered User
Joined
Jan 11, 2017
Messages
17
Location
San Pedro
It sounds like some of you are already inspectors and feel that it is a great career and rewarding as well as challenging. This is exactly what I'm looking for in my career. Could my youth also be a down side when I'm being interviewed?
 

ICE

Moderator
Joined
Jun 23, 2011
Messages
9,609
Location
California concrete jungle
@cda im 32. @ICE id like to do the job correctly so that I may advance and have a career instead of a job. Is this not what people do as inspectors? I know the joke in the field is that inspectors don't know anything. I don't think that's true but maybe it is. Do most inspectors not know what there doing?
I work with 150 other inspectors. Like any other job, some are good at it and some shouldn't be doing it. The emphasis is on customer service rather than competent inspections. In another five years inspectors will not need correction notices. That will be a boon for the construction industry and there will be no turning back. Of course this is Southern California which is a world all to it's own.
 

cda

Sawhorse 123
Joined
Oct 19, 2009
Messages
20,358
Location
Basement
Was wondering where the California people were?


Come on offer him an interview,, Better a job!!!
 

Tkosinski2

Registered User
Joined
Jan 11, 2017
Messages
17
Location
San Pedro
Could anyone recommend an inspection company in or around the Los Angeles area that might be willing to give someone training and a chance?
 

Tkosinski2

Registered User
Joined
Jan 11, 2017
Messages
17
Location
San Pedro
Can anyone help me find where the inspectors of Southern California meet? I'd like to make my presence known like you all have suggested but not sure where to start
 

mmmarvel

Moderator
Joined
Oct 29, 2009
Messages
354
Location
Houston, TX
Hello all! I'm new to the forum. Names Tad. Just wanted to give some background and get some advice. Worked in hvac for my dads company for over ten years. Been on construction sites since I was like 9. Got my ICC cert for plumbing and started to apply for inspector jobs. Been having a hard time getting anything I'll get the invite to the test and interview andnevermake it past. Being in hvac I never really felt with foundations. I also went to the local community college and have an associates degree in building inspection technology. My question is how do I go about getting training to become an inspector?

Im married and just had my first child. She's six months old. My problem is I currently work in the automotive trade because my fathers company wasn't making me enough money to support my family. I had a friend who got me a job as a technician making a lot more money. I have no contractors license so to try to make the same money in construction isn't easy right now.

So here is my two cents worth. I graduated with a Associates degree in building inspection, the problem was I had no real construction experience, I got 8 certifications behind me but my lack of experience stopped me dead. I ended up getting hired by a 'special testing' firm, they sample and tested concrete as well as verified that the stuff being poured was the proper design mix. Read plans for epoxy anchors, checked plans and did inspections for masonry, welding, etc. Lots of things that the typical inspector doesn't have time for as well as they don't go and get the certifications for. That job lasted 3 years until the recession hit, but my experience and certs got me my present job with an airport. Bottom line, look a little outside the box. I would think your best bet is to get your mechanical cert and seek out mechanical inspector jobs. Some private firms also hire mechanical inspectors, since you've worked in HVAC you have a good idea of what you are looking at/for - good luck.
 

mmmarvel

Moderator
Joined
Oct 29, 2009
Messages
354
Location
Houston, TX
Two cents more - do code compliance, it's a chance to get your foot in the door and gain experience. Seriously consider moving and check out the employment section of this board; I'll keep my eye peeled for entry level jobs.

There is a company busy in so cal, here is the link, they are presently looking for (among other positions) a permit tech - again it's a foot in the door.
http://www.californiacodecheck.com/careers/
 
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