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Sill Plate Bolt Embedment

Discussion in 'Residential Structural Codes' started by jar546, Aug 14, 2019.

  1. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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    Where do we even start? Even the layout is wrong.
    IMG_8580.jpg
     
  2. TheCommish

    TheCommish Sawhorse

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    right not the layout seems to be wrong, nothing to keep the carpenter from drilling and setting appropriate anchor such as epoxy bolts correctly.
     
  3. Pcinspector1

    Pcinspector1 Platinum Member

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    Anchor bolts in wrong locations. Should be 12-inches from each corner, I count TWO corners.

    Anchor selection and depth? One appears to be low and may not catch the sill plate material.
     
  4. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    A "no-super" job?
     
  5. e hilton

    e hilton Bronze Member

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    We always jab them into the wet mortar. You’re the first person to complain, eveyone else says they are fine.
     
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  6. Mark K

    Mark K Platinum Member

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    Jabbing anchor bolts in wet concrete is not fine and any contractor who says it is ok should have his license revoked.
     
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  7. e hilton

    e hilton Bronze Member

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    Mark ... sarcasm
    And those bolts are in mortar, not concrete, i bet the pullout strength is very low.
     
  8. JCraver

    JCraver Sawhorse

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    I'd have to fail every job I see if that were true
     
  9. Pcinspector1

    Pcinspector1 Platinum Member

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    Block construction apparently creates anchor placement issues that conflict with the code requirements. But like someone said, come back and add some drill type anchors to appease the inspector?

    On poured foundations and slabs, we don't typically see the blue anchor bolt standoffs used here, L-anchors are wet set here 90% of the time.
     
  10. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    Setting into "wet" is one thing but into CMU is entirely another.
    Do regional methods and means differ, to some degree but to code minimums, debatable.
     
  11. Mark K

    Mark K Platinum Member

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    While I said concrete I could just as well said grout. For this discussion there is no difference.

    Am not aware of any code that has provisions for anchor bolts or anchor rods in the joints between masonry units. So why are they accepted?

    All the concrete block construction that I have sees uses hollow block where the cells can be filled with grout. The bolts are then inserted in the cells before the cell is filled with grout. The picture suggests that there were hollow cell blocks on the project.

    Just because it is a regional practice does not mean that it makes sense or is code compliant.

    There is a phenomena know as normalization of deviance. This played a significant role with the failures of steel moment frames that we found after the Northridge earthquake. What happens is that if people accept deviations from the code too often the deviations are seen as the new normal. The process repeats itself.

    I can hear a lot of screaming and shouting but I believe that a lot of there problems would be avoided if engineers were involved in the design of houses.

    I also believe that each building department should have at least one registered civil engineer
     
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  12. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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    I am agreement with your statements. As far as having an RDP/engineer in each building department, that is just not feasible in most cases as some places are just a one man band and there is not budget for anything more.
     
  13. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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    As far as my opinion on the original picture posted, not one bolt would be compliant in any way, shape or form. You can't cap with 4" solid and slip an anchor bolt in between a joint on top of the joint of the block below and think you are anywhere near compliant with the code. If you are the kind to approve this, you are not doing your job.
     
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  14. JCraver

    JCraver Sawhorse

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    My reply was just to this sentence, in case there's any confusion. The pic in the OP is obviously wrong, just like the sentence is.

    I'm not arguing the engineer thing again...
     
  15. mtlogcabin

    mtlogcabin Sawhorse

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    Curious, Why a civil engineer versus a structural engineer.
    I would think a structural would be more beneficial to a building department
    Also are you thinking a licensed engineer or someone with an engineering degree.

    Smaller jurisdiction might be able to afford a person with a degree versus one who is licensed
     
  16. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    You have to start somewhere to stop the practice JC.
     
  17. tmurray

    tmurray Sawhorse

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    There are as many poor engineers as there are poor contractors and building officials. No occupation is immune from incompetence.

    I really doubt that requiring an engineer on each house will result in anything other than a race to the lowest quality of engineering service borne out of the cost of the service.
     
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  18. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    Oh "yee" of little faith.

    In LA after Northridge the City required all engineered projects to be "field" inspected by the EOR or his designated representative "before" the city inspector's framing inspection.
     
  19. mtlogcabin

    mtlogcabin Sawhorse

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    That might be one of the reasons why you cannot build an SFR for $100.00 per square foot in that area
     
  20. Rick18071

    Rick18071 Sawhorse

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    So guys what is the fix? Does Simpson make something?
     

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