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Today in History

Discussion in 'Industry News' started by mark handler, Nov 21, 2019.

  1. mark handler

    mark handler Sawhorse

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    1980: MGM Grand fire
    Fire at the MGM Grand Hotel-Casino killed 85 in Las Vegas. It is one of the worst hotel fires in American history. It was started by electric ground fault behind a wall near the serving station. The vibration of the rotating cabinet had caused the wiring to fray and the wires rubbed together. The fire began there and burned for a while, undetected.



    [​IMG]
     
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  2. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    Only by "deaths" will codes be changed, a sobering thought.
     
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  3. mark handler

    mark handler Sawhorse

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    They change, but without deaths, they change with more objections and whining.
     
  4. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    And "monetery loss by insurance companies" That is what created fire sprinklers.
     
  5. fatboy

    fatboy Administrator

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    End of the day..........deaths drive substantial code changes.

    Hopefully we have it figured out.
     
  6. steveray

    steveray Sawhorse

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    And this is why we have finish ratings too...

    The fire spread to the lobby, fed by wallpaper, PVC piping, glue, and plastic mirrors, racing through the casino floor at a speed of 15–19 ft/s (4.6–5.8 m/s; 10–13 mph; 16–21 km/h) until a massive fireball blew out the main entrance along The Strip.

    How fast do you run?
     
  7. mark handler

    mark handler Sawhorse

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    The Nov 25th 1978 Holiday Inn Fire broke out at the Holiday Inn-Northwest which was located at 1525 West Ridge Road in the Town of Greece, near Rochester, New York, on November 26, 1978, and killed ten people. Seven of the fatalities were Canadian; 88 Canadians were staying in the hotel at the time on a holiday shopping trip. The fire was considered notable enough by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and The Center for Fire Research to document the fire in their 1979 publications. In the end, 10 people were killed and 34 injured. In 2008, the NFPA listed the 1978 Holiday Inn Fire as one of only three dozen or so fires which killed 10 or more people in the United States between 1934 and 2006.
    The building was built in 1963 at a cost of $1.3 million and consisted of a wood frame structure with interior hallways and 91 rooms. The building had passed a fire inspection earlier in the month. The fire started on the first floor between the north and west wings of the hotel around 2:30 am. Cleaning supplies and paper products were stored in a closet near the fire's point of origin. Due to fire doors being left opened and the nearby combustible materials, the fire spread very rapidly. The fire alarm system was not tied to a dispatch center and although some people reported a bell ringing, they failed to realize it was the emergency alarm bell. The fire was not reported to the fire department until 2:38 am when an off duty firefighter passing by reported it. The fire burned out of control for more than two hours. One hundred and twenty-five firefighters from six area fire companies responded. About 170 people were rescued from the building by firefighters and passers-by. The fire was declared under control at 4:34 a.m. with an ultimate toll of 10 dead—eight women and two men—and 34 injured. Investigators said the fire broke windows in the hallways connecting the motel's two wings. Flames shot up to the roofs of both wings and swept through an open area between the room's ceilings and roofs. Firewalls in the buildings did not extend to the roof, allowing the fire to rip through the top floor of each wing. The burning roof had collapsed into the top floor rooms.

    Investigation.
    Initially, the police did not consider the fire suspicious. Questions arose about whether or not the fire alarms could be heard in the lobby of the hotel when firefighters arrived. While hotel officials said the alarms were functioning, firefighters first at the scene said they were unable to hear the bells. Although the building met existing fire codes, it lacked some fire prevention equipment including smoke detectors and a sprinkler system. Additionally, the fire alarm system was not connected to the Greece-Ridge Fire Department or any other security agency, and there was only one vertical fire wall between the two wings. The alarm system consisted only of one bell in the middle of each of the two wings. John Stickevers, an expert fire investigator from New York City, was brought in to assist with the investigation. He discovered that an uncommon highly flammable liquid accelerant was used to start the fire inside a storage cupboard under the first floor stairwell. The fire was officially ruled as an arson attack.
    In early 2011, the Greece Police Department launched the most intensive investigation of the fire in the last thirty years. On November 26, 2014, police announced that they have identified a suspect for the first time, 36 years after the fire. In 2018, it was reported that the investigation had been narrowed down to two suspects but disagreements between Greece Police and the Monroe County District Attorney on which suspect is responsible and over proof of arson have stalled the investigation.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1978_Holiday_Inn_fire
     
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  8. mark handler

    mark handler Sawhorse

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    Nov 27th 1910: New York's Pennsylvania Station opens
    Designed by architects McKim, Mead and White, the Pennsylvania station also known as the Penn Station, was opened to public after nine years of construction.
    upload_2019-11-27_5-50-47.png
     
  9. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    "9" years! pre CM! talk about a delay claim. Then again it was a Public Works Project.
     
  10. TheCommish

    TheCommish Sawhorse

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  11. mark handler

    mark handler Sawhorse

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  12. mark handler

    mark handler Sawhorse

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  13. jar546

    jar546 *****istrator

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    Lessons learned
     
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  14. mark handler

    mark handler Sawhorse

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    Fire destroys the Crystal Palace
    The Victorian masterpiece was burned to the ground on November 29th, 1936.
    Richard Cavendish
    upload_2019-11-30_10-20-26.png

    Crystal Palace, November 30th, 1936
    The original Crystal Palace was the centrepiece of the Great Exhibition of 1851 in London. Built in what is now Kensington Gardens, it was an astonishing prefabricated construction, created on parkland and still with many trees inside. Masterfully designed in glass, iron and wood by the architect Joseph Paxton, it wowed thousands of visitors to the exhibition from this country and all over the world and there could hardly have been a more effective demonstration of advanced British technology.
    When the exhibition closed the following year, Sir Joseph Paxton, as he now was, pointed out that the building could be taken to pieces again and moved somewhere else. At his suggestion, it was dismantled and taken to the village of Sydenham in Kent. Paxton organised the financing and ran the whole operation and the palace was recreated, even larger than before and topped by an imposing Moorish dome, in open parkland on a hilltop from which it could be seen for miles around.
    Formally opened by Queen Victoria, the work was completed in 1854 with gardens and trees, fountains, a maze, lifesize figures of dinosaurs, which attracted particular attention, and statues that would later include a bust of Paxton, who died in 1865, aged 61, by then a man-mountain so huge he could only be moved by wheelchair. All sorts of events were held there, including firework displays, cat and dog shows, cricket and football matches. A one-off Olympic Games was staged there in 1866. Crystal Palace now had its own railway station and Sydenham developed into a prosperous London suburb.
    On a November evening in 1936 a local was walking his dog past the building when he saw flames inside. Hurrying in, with the dog, he found two nightwatchmen vainly trying to extinguish what had started as a small fire but was being fanned by a rising wind. He called the fire brigade, which arrived about 8pm, found it could not cope and summoned help. Hundreds more firemen reached the scene, with more than 80 fire engines from Kent and parts of London.
    Every effort was made to put the flames out, but they grew stronger and were accompanied by clouds of sparks and fierce explosions. Thousands of people flocked to watch, on foot or by bicycle, car and van, with special trains put on from towns in Kent and even a few private aeroplanes flying enquiringly overhead. Mounted police did their best to control the spectators, but they seriously hindered the fire fighters, as well as causing damage to local people’s properties. When morning came most of Paxton’s masterpiece had been reduced to twisted metal and heaps of ash.
    No lives were lost and just how the fire had begun was never established. Rival theories attributed it to a cigarette left burning that ignited wooden flooring, or to deliberate sabotage by a disgruntled worker or some sort of extremist. John Logie Baird, the television pioneer who had a workshop in the building, traced the fire to some gas cylinders that he discovered had been delivered to his staff late and left with a watchman. Baird thought one of the cylinders might have been leaking gas, which could have been ignited by the watchman’s gas ring and caused all the other cylinders to blow up like a bomb going off.
    Crystal Palace Park has survived to this day and is now in the London borough of Bromley. It is home to the Crystal Palace National Sports Centre, which opened in 1964, with an athletics stadium which had been the home ground of Crystal Palace Football Club from 1906. The FA Cup Final was played there in most years between 1895 and 1914. The maze was repaired in the 1980s and flights of steps with figures of sphinxes mark the one-time Italian Terraces. The life-size figures of dinosaurs created in the 1850s were made by the sculptor Benjamin Waterhouse Hawkins on the best scientific advice then available. They are no longer considered entirely accurate, but they are a riveting sight. They fell gradually into disrepair and were sometimes damaged by vandals. An expensive refurbishment began in 2002 and is still continuing
    All sorts of suggestions for developing Crystal Palace Park have been made in recent years, often arousing considerable local opposition. They have included building houses and flats on part of the park, new landscaping, a skate park and a new cafe. In 2013 a Chinese developer proposed to recreate Paxton’s original building. The future is uncertain and looks likely to remain so.
     
  15. mark handler

    mark handler Sawhorse

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    Nov 30, 2018 Anchorage earthquake
    Severe damage to several buildings and a highway overpass near Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport was reported.
    There were no fatalities, but at least 117 people were injured, mostly for minor injuries such as cuts, bruises or anxiety.
    Many suffered broken bones.
    Landings at three airports were temporarily affected by the earthquakee across the city.
    Liquefaction was reported.
    Many roads were also damaged.
    Overall, damage in Anchorage was estimated to be at least US $30 million, including $10 million to repair pipes, and $10 million in public facilities.
    Damage estimates to the Anchorage School District ranged from $25 to $50 million.
     
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  16. mark handler

    mark handler Sawhorse

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    On December 2, 2016, at approximately 11:20 p.m. PST, a fire broke out in a former warehouse that had been converted into an artist collective with living spaces known as Ghost Ship. At the time, the warehouse in the Fruitvale neighborhood of Oakland, California, was hosting a concert featuring artists from the house music record label 100% Silk. The warehouse was only permitted for industrial purposes. Residential and entertainment uses were illegal
     
  17. mark handler

    mark handler Sawhorse

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    December . 03 1984
    Toxic gas leaks from a Union Carbide plant and results in the deaths of thousands in Bhopal, India.
     
  18. mark handler

    mark handler Sawhorse

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    The Worcester Cold Storage and Warehouse Co. fire began on December 3, 1999, in a 93-year-old abandoned building at 266 Franklin Street, Worcester, Massachusetts. The fire was started accidentally some time between 4:30–5:45 pm by two homeless people (Thomas Levesque and Julie Ann Barnes) who were squatting in the building and had knocked over a candle. They left the scene without reporting the fire. The 6-story building, previously used as a meat cold storage facility, had no windows above the ground floor and no fire detection or suppression systems. The fire, which started on the second story, burned undetected for 30–90 minutes...
    The six-story building's exterior walls were constructed of approximately 18 inches of brick and mortar, with no windows above the second floor.
    The lack of available windows prevented firefighting personnel from making an accurate initial assessment of the fire. Initial breaching of lower-floor doors, combined with venting the building by smashing an elevator-shaft roof skylight, effectively turned the building into a huge chimney.
    With the fire rapidly accelerating out of control, rescue teams facing near-zero visibility became lost with available breathing air depleted.
    Despite repeated radio calls for help, along with activation of audible location alarms, six firefighters perished in the blaze.
    It took eight days to find and recover the remains of the six men.
     
  19. my250r11

    my250r11 Sawhorse

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    Very sad story.:(
     
  20. TheCommish

    TheCommish Sawhorse

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    Should be a good series, produced by Denis Leary who is a Worcester native, took up the cause shortly after the fire linked here. I am from the area and a member of my town's FD, we assisted and will continue to assist our neighbors at all times.
     

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