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Wrong for two reasons.

Discussion in 'Residential Foundation Codes' started by ICE, Aug 2, 2011.

  1. ICE

    ICE Sawhorse

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  2. TimNY

    TimNY Platinum Member

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    No beam or girder to carry to load above the openings.. and that's an A35, not an LPT4, connecting the full-depth blocking to the sill; A35 is not listed for that use.

    Will be interesting to see how the tension ties fall on the blocking (or the joists). If they line the studs up with the joists the nails for the ties will be in the end grain of the joists, which is not permitted.
     
  3. ICE

    ICE Sawhorse

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    Think shear wall. In both cases the wall above is one. The crawl hole should not be there at all. What do I do when another inspector approved this at the foundation inspection?
     
  4. Mule

    Mule Platinum Member

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    The other inspector needs to be made aware of his mistakes.

    My question.... it appears you have a lot of construction going on by the amount of pictures you post. And from as many pictures as you post of faulty construction I have to wonder what the "other" inspectors have been allowing over the past! At some point in time you would think that the contractors would be semi trained to half way do it right! Good for you Tiger for getting some of the construction corrected!
     
  5. ICE

    ICE Sawhorse

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    I stopped wondering what other inspectors allow a long time ago. The contractors run the gamut, from real good to, "I'll be with you as soon as we find Fredo's thumb", terrible.
     
  6. fatboy

    fatboy Administrator

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    I won't speak to whatever shear issue is at hand, but the crawl access could be fixed with an appropriatelly sized beam across the opening. Fixable.......
     
  7. RJJ

    RJJ Platinum Member

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    I agree with the Fat one!
     
  8. Dawgbark

    Dawgbark Member

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    Simple fixes on the joist but fixing stupid without the box of candy is real hard when it comes to the trade mechanics. Your Building Inspector issue could be (as quoted off the Web) nonfeasance "a Failure to perform an act that is either an official duty or a legal requirement. The failure to act when under an obligation to do so; a refusal (without sufficient excuse) to do that which it is your legal duty to do, dereliction - willful negligence", if that is what is going on the good ol'boy system. Then again, without seeing the job, seeing the plans, observing what had been signed off and what had not, it is hard to concur who is doing what. There are issues which need fixed, if the supervisors are not in the field watching staff to verify the property owners building is being built to at least minimum code as it is enforced there then there is your problem.
     
  9. Yankee

    Yankee Sawhorse

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    Maybe we can stop knocking other building inspectors for the most part? I'm glad there are some places where all the issues are identified upon inspection, but you are living in a dream world if you believe that to be the case in the majority of jurisdictions.

    ICE, what is the population of your jurisdiction (and what are you responsible for inspecting?)
     
  10. ICE

    ICE Sawhorse

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    Near 4 million....My area is perhaps 70K

    In both cases that are pictured a header was installed and hold downs were added at each end of the shear wall.
     
  11. Yankee

    Yankee Sawhorse

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    My question was more toward how many inspectors work in your same geographic area, or are you responsible for all of the types of inspections in your geographical area (or, what types of inspections are you responsible for)?
     
  12. ICE

    ICE Sawhorse

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    There is usually just me. Lately I have been training an inspector so I have another inspectors help for half a day. I do all types of inspections.
     
  13. Yankee

    Yankee Sawhorse

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    So when you said "What do I do when another inspector approved this at the foundation inspection?" are you referring to your trainee?
     
  14. ICE

    ICE Sawhorse

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    no........I was in another area when this happened.
     
  15. Yankee

    Yankee Sawhorse

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    I guess my point is, there are inspectors like yourself who know a lot about what they are inspecting, and there are other inspectors that are still learning. No one comes into the job knowing what they know after being around 10 or 15 years or more. Your photos are very educational, but not if it is intimidating to those that really need the lessons the most. Not too many people who don't know what they are looking at are going to want to post a question, so full explanations are helpful. Certainly knocking the other inspector isn't going to inspire others to ask questions. Just sayin'.
     
  16. ICE

    ICE Sawhorse

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    I disagree but then, none of that should be a problem for you in the future, so a lengthy reply isn't necessary.

    A day later I have decided to answer the one point that matters.

    I asked a question and nobody answered the question. So what do you do when you are faced with a mistake like this?

    I have contractors tell me that there is nothing I can do because it was approved by another inspector. I have contractors whine "Am I going to get new corrections with every new inspector". I have contractors point to the approved plans that show the hole right where it is. I have contractors ask "Why didn't the last inspector say something"? I have contractors spitting mad at me because they made a mistake.

    How do you answer those questions and what do you do? I've given you my answer. There is no engineer to consult.

    You state that I am knocking the inspector by pointing it out. I reckon the inspector knocked himself. The mere fact that I acknowledged his mistake is taken, by you, as a slur. Well it happens....too often. Oh and as far as inspiring new inspectors to ask questions.... Most of what I have done here doesn't fall into the inspirational category. If anything, most of what I have done is the antithesis of inspiration. Who in his right mind would find inspiration from me. New inspectors should be kept away from me.

    When faced with the situation of the OP, I write the correction and make sure that the previous inspector performs the next inspection. I don't say a word to him. He sees his mistake. He gets sh!t on by the contractor. It's called a learning experience.
     
    #16 ICE, Aug 8, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 8, 2011
  17. Dawgbark

    Dawgbark Member

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    Thanks for the photos, In the field when I find something others missed I indicate the problem to the person letting them know so in so will be back tomorrow with our boss and the issue will be settled at that time. However just so we all understand where the issues are, here is a Notice of Violation that will explain what the supervisor will be discussing with you. However, these other items I was just going to tell the inspector he missed at the office are indicated on the NOV items 3 through 47 all of them listing the location where they may be found on your approved plan or the type five sheet.

    Other than that I just let the other inspector know of the work that went on after they had signed off the partial inspection the contractor asked for.

    Thanks again for the photos.
     
  18. DRP

    DRP Gold Member

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    My only question is just what is that in fig R404.1.5(1)?
     
  19. Yankee

    Yankee Sawhorse

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    I believe you misunderstand my point. I was referring to the discussions you have said you want on this board about the pictures you post. They have the potential of being very educational. They have the potential of simply taking up a lot of space. In order to encourage participation and discussion from the (hundreds?) of lurkers on this site, many of whom are probably inspectors not nearly as accomplished as yourself, I was simply suggesting that you might want to think about your approach.Oh and, thanks for all the pictures.
     
  20. Mac

    Mac Gold Member

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    I'd bring the "other inspector" matter to your supervisor's attention. Let the higher ups do thier job which includes supervising other inspectors. Heck I bet nobody else here has ever missed anything on an inspection.
     

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