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Wrong for two reasons.

Discussion in 'Residential Foundation Codes' started by ICE, Aug 2, 2011.

  1. ICE

    ICE Sawhorse

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    I have never gone to a supervisor. Supervisors have come to me because a contractor has complained that I crossed out an inspector's approval or because I write corrections that other inspectors don't. Where I work, the emphasis is on keeping everybody happy and not code compliance. The usual outcome when a contractor complains is that the previous inspector handles the job from that point forward and everybody is back to happy land. As it stands now, too many inspectors are loathe to have me follow up on their inspections and if I went to the boss it would get worse. Besides that, it's not my style to rat them out. I just write the corrections that need to be written and let the chips fall where they may.
     
    #21 ICE, Aug 12, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 12, 2011
  2. Mac

    Mac Gold Member

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    "Happy land" - I like that!

    Whatever your usual routine is, the point is to get compliance. I don't want to rat out anybody either, but sometimes people seem to hear things better from their boss...
     
  3. mtlogcabin

    mtlogcabin Sawhorse

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    Maybe a smaller juridiction is easier. When one inspector missed something (or plans examiner) if it is minor it is discusssed at our weekly staff meetings. We are all big boys and we know we have different levels of knowledge and experience. If it is major we take the position in the field that we are questioning what we see and not sure but will check the code and get back with them. If the original inspector missed it then HE goes back and gets it corrected. Improves memory when you have to correct your own mistakes. We have pretty good group, egos are not a problem with the current staff they do not have a problem with being questioned about a decision or admmiting mistakes.
     
  4. Dawgbark

    Dawgbark Member

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    I know this is an old post but it is very refreshing to hear of a group that work together and keep the ego part of it at home, also that weekly meeting are given to work out the short falls. Where I work that use to be the case and the weekly meeting were usefull. New boss' new workers no meetings no one knows what is going on and the new guys are a bunch of cry babies that think everyone is picking on them. And as far as the boss' go now, you had not ever think about discussing a problem on a job where problems are or of you making a mistake unless you are the pet. Paper in the folder the department has gone from one of the best ISO rating to one of the worst in Ca. and these new boss' think you need one Engineer to plans check for every field Inspector is a cost savings factor because private engineers can not be trusted. I'll shut up now. :yawn
     
    #24 Dawgbark, Aug 13, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 13, 2011
  5. peach

    peach Sawhorse

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    almost nothing is unfixable... just costy.
     
  6. ICE

    ICE Sawhorse

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    And it is never too late to start over.
     
  7. peach

    peach Sawhorse

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    You're not "their" friend.. if it's wrong, it's wrong.. not your job to tell them how to fix it, either.
     
  8. KZQuixote

    KZQuixote Sawhorse

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    Right on Peach! Except for one dimension, have you considered the demands the job put's on the inspector? He/She knows how to do it but can't open their yaps for fear of pronouncing their own code? Used to be and still is that old builders became inspectors. Have you ever wondered why that model doesn't work as well today?

    Nothing will change till our "highly trained professionals" are treated as such!

    Bill
     
  9. ICE

    ICE Sawhorse

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    Who is "their" you refer to? Is it the contractor, homeowner or the inspector? In either case, I am not their enemy and I count many as a friend. You say it's not my job to tell them how to fix mistakes. If I don't do it, who will? Should I send every little thing to an engineer? Hell, all day long, I am explaining how to do it right. I could write the correction and leave them scratching their heads but the next time it will be wrong again.

    I enjoy a great deal of leeway when it comes to fixes. I have seen just about every imaginable mistake a dozen times. I know what works and this is houses we are talking about. It's not that complicated. If it is complicated, I consult my engineer. I don't ask him for a fix, I ask him if a fix will work.

    For sure, my way is not for everybody. Some jurisdictions would frown on me. Some inspectors aren't up to the task. I get the job done and the work meets or exceeds code. I couldn't imagine writing corrections and walking away. If an inspector does that, the recipient must be left thinking: He knows what is wrong but he doesn't know what is right or he's a jerk for not telling me.
     
    #29 ICE, Aug 17, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 18, 2011
  10. pyrguy

    pyrguy Moderator

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    Most employers take a dim view of an inspector crossing the 'line' over to the design side. In this day and age the added liability for them and you is unwanted. In some placees it would get a written repremand in your file.

    For me it is just not worth hearing, "we fixed it just like you said." and it being worse than before because they misunderstood.
     
  11. Min&Max

    Min&Max Silver Member

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    I'm with ICE. Many of the customers and contractors are are more than just work day encounters. If I know of a method to correct their problem I will offer them that option or the option of seeking other input to a solution. To tag something and not share an acceptable fix is irresponsible and ethically corrupt. And some wonder why the public and contractors see us as arrogant, bureaucratic jerks.
     
  12. incognito

    incognito Silver Member

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    To many are worried about "liability" and use it as an excuse not to do their job. Way easier to just walk away after failing an inspection than to help contractor or owner resolve the issue.
     
  13. codeworks

    codeworks Gold Member

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    Interesting post. Maybe we are not "their friend". We are, (at least i am) a public servant, employed in a publicly funded governmental agency, paid for by tax payer monies, who come to us daily for permits, inspections and information about all sorts of questions, problems and "what ifs" related to construction. They rely on us to be a part of the "flow on their" project. That being said, i feel it is necessary on my part (and it is the departments position) that we provide service. If that means helping folks to find a solution to a needed correction, that's what we do. We can't design, however we can provid options to remedy non-complying work. Will i show someone a span table to help them meet code requirements, you bet. Will i open the nec and read a code section with a contractor, yes. Education of our contractors ( and ourselves) will lead us all to better relationships with those we inspect. I disagree with a "write em up and leave em to figure it on their own" attitude. Some one taught me, now it's mine to give freely and in a free exchange of knowledge come better working relationsips. Would it hepl if they all read code books, yes, but we live in an imperfect world, no one of us has "all ther answers"
     
    #33 codeworks, Aug 25, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 25, 2011
  14. Min&Max

    Min&Max Silver Member

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    Codeworks, I agree with most except, I am NOT a public servant. I am an employee of the community in which I live and work. I am a source of info so you can complete a quality project.

    Now that I have the mic, I am NOT a code enforcement inspector. I am a quality control inspector. Just as most would expect their new toaster to go through a quality control inspection why would we not sell ourselves in this same view, as quality control. Merely an extra set of eyes making sure that nothing was forgotten or installed incorrectly.
     

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