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306.2 Appliances in rooms.

Discussion in 'Mechanical Codes' started by Rick18071, Oct 2, 2019.

  1. Rick18071

    Rick18071 Sawhorse

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    An office has a electric instant hot water heater in a closet that has a 30" door. Would this closet be considered a room and need to have a 36" door? Or does the room the closet is in only needs to have a 36" door? Or both? Or does any of these doors opening need to be not less than 36"?

    306.2 Appliances in rooms. Rooms containing appliances
    shall be provided with a door and an unobstructed passage-
    way measuring not less than 36 inches (914 mm) wide and 80
    inches (2032 mm) high.
    Exception: Within a dwelling unit, appliances installed in
    a compartment, alcove, basement or similar space shall be
    accessed by an opening or door and an unobstructed passageway
    measuring not less than 24 inches (610 mm) wide
    and large enough to allow removal of the largest appliance
    in the space, provided that a level service space of not less
    than 30 inches (762 mm) deep and the height of the appliance,
    but not less than 30 inches (762 mm), is present at
    the front or service side of the appliance with the door
    open.
     
    ADAguy likes this.
  2. cda

    cda Sawhorse

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    large enough to allow removal of the largest appliance
     
  3. Rick18071

    Rick18071 Sawhorse

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    This is only required for attics and under floors not rooms.
     
  4. Paul Sweet

    Paul Sweet Sawhorse

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    This has probably been in the code since boilers were the size of locomotives. A door "large enough to allow removal of the largest appliance" should meet the intent of the code. However, check the NEC for required service space for the disconnect.
     
  5. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    Important point, based on occupancy?
     
  6. steveray

    steveray Sawhorse

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    Only if it is "fused"/ OCPD IMO.....
     
  7. my250r11

    my250r11 Sawhorse

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    I would disagree with this statement.
    .

    Can the "Closet" just be consider a mechanical room, or closet. Closet IMO assumes it will have clothes in it.
     
  8. Ty J.

    Ty J. Sawhorse

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    I agree with Mike. Often the space where an interior HVAC unit is installed is not large enough to be considered a habitable room and is more aptly called a closet.

    And is a closet not an alcove with a door?
     
  9. Rick18071

    Rick18071 Sawhorse

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    OK most of you don't think a closet is a room, and I am talking about an office (commercial)

    Does the room where the closet is need to have a 36" door? (Old building with existing 34" doors but new water heater.)
    Does IMC 306.2 means a room where a small instant water heater is requires the door to be not less than a 36" opening ?

    How far does the required unobstructed passage-way measuring not less than 36 inches (914 mm) wide and 80
    inches (2032 mm) high need to go, to the exterior? (This is room in a old basement with a low ceiling (stairway too), and narrow exterior door. Building about 30 years old and built before we had codes.)
     
  10. my250r11

    my250r11 Sawhorse

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    IMHO, if it is existing bldg. would make the installation of the new WH as complaint as possible and not worry about the rest. They got the old one out so the opening should be large enough.
     
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  11. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    Tend to see where my is coming from, replacement of existing, a maintenance item, no?
     
  12. Rick18071

    Rick18071 Sawhorse

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    This is a new water heater for a sink in a different room in a existing building, not a replacement. I am not the best when it comes to the mechanical code. I just want to know if 306.2 is to be enforced or ignored.
     
  13. my250r11

    my250r11 Sawhorse

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    I would say if it is easily achievable then would be fine. But if ceiling height is already to low or the bldg owners go with hardship or technically infeasible, you may only get them to install the WH compliant. If your the BO it will still be your call to make. If not talk to the BO to get his feel on the situation.
     
    #13 my250r11, Oct 3, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2019
  14. ICE

    ICE Sawhorse

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    The key word in all of this is "small". The so-called appliance is about the size of a lunch box....and unless you are fatboy, that's a small appliance. It's under a sink.....could be in a cabinet. The door to the closet has nothing to do with the water heater.
     
  15. Rick18071

    Rick18071 Sawhorse

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    My code book doesn't have an exception for small appliances. Where does this come from?
     
  16. my250r11

    my250r11 Sawhorse

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    I think another way of saying what ICE said is if it were mounted under a sink or cabinet would you still ask the same questions of make the cabinet 80" high & 36" high.
    As with your previous statement, it does not state only for attics & under floor.

    I believe you are honestly trying to see the argument going both ways, but like most things in the code it DEPENDS on situation, Laws, and the interpretation of the AHJ.
     
  17. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    Lets rehash:
    1. A commercial office building
    2. With a closet with a instahot water heater (gas or electric?)
    3. Depth of closet less than 24"?
    3. Remotely serves another location.
    4. No holding tank, only shut off valves?
    5. Could be placed under a sink?
     
  18. Rick18071

    Rick18071 Sawhorse

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    The point I'm trying to say is this section unreasonable for some installations? It just says an appliance which could be anything inside a cabinet, under a sink, or under a stairway. It seems to me that this section could be improved including where the passageway should go to.
     
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  19. ADAguy

    ADAguy Sawhorse

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    dictionary definition for appliance is that is a "domestic" convenience item, typically not Attached though some may be.
    Also typically plug-in vs hardwired. Do you consider a garbage disposal to be an appliance?
     
  20. Rick18071

    Rick18071 Sawhorse

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    IMC definitions
    APPLIANCE. A device or apparatus that is manufactured
    and designed to utilize energy and for which this code provides
    specific requirements.
     
    Glenn likes this.

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